Dr. Smooth’s Flashback #6: Billboard Contemporary Jazz chart of August 20, 1988

Spend an hour remembering some of the most popular jazz of late summer 1988 as listed on the Top Contemporary Jazz Albums chart in the August 20, 1988 issue of Billboard magazine.

Playlist:


shaw

#25: “Put It Where You Want It” by George Shaw and Jetstream, from the #25 album of the week, Skywalkers. This classic Crusaders tune was the lead track from this covers album; that’s the Crusaders’ Wilton Felder on saxophone. The album had premiered on the Contemporary Jazz chart on July 9; this week marked its final appearance.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 19 8

take6

#24: “Spread Love” by Take 6, from the #24 album of the week, Take 6. The a capella gospel album premiered on the chart this week before having a surprising ten week. The album spent 2 full years on a Billboard chart that went through 3 names during those two years: “Spiritual,” “Inspirational,” and, finally, “Contemporary Christian.” The album won a Grammy award for Best Soul Gospel Performance by a Duo or Group, Choir or Chorus while this song won for Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Duo or Group.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 19 10
Billboard 200 71 19
R&B 41 22
Spiritual/Inspirational 3 104

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#23: “River Song” by Dave Grusin and Don Grusin, from the #23 album of the week, Sticks and Stones.  Keyboardists Dave and younger brother Don put out this album on Dave’s GRP label (Dave is the G in GRP). This album only charted for 2½ months, but Dave was too busy to mind – he won the best original score Oscar in 1988 for his soundtrack to The Milagro Beanfield War.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 14 10

1423_foto1_product_groot

#22: “Nothing Can Come Between Us” by Sade from the #22 album, Stronger Than Pride. This was a successful single from a huge album – the single peaked at #3 R&B and #21 Adult Contemporary. Despite the fact that only lead singer Sade Adu appears on the album covers, the label and musicians insist that Sade is a band name.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 21 12
Billboard 200 7 45
R&B 3 44

download

#19: “Smoke Gets in Your Eyes” by Patti Austin from the #19 album, The Real Me. This album, Austin’s seventh, consists mainly of standards updated with modern arrangements. This cut was written by composer Jerome Kern and lyricist Otto Harbach for the 1933 musical Roberta. This version was arranged and produced by David Pack (Ambrosia) and features sax work from Ernie Watts.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 7 16
R&B 56 14

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#16: “Los Cabos” by the Rippingtons from the #16 album, Kilimanjaro. The band’s second album, this album had debuted on the Contemporary Jazz chart at #9 on April 30; it was near the end of its chart run on this date.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 3 20
Billboard 200 110 15
1988 Jazz Year End 14

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#14: “The Power of Suggestion” by Richard Elliot from the #14 album, The Power of Suggestion. The title track from this instrumental pop album was featured on many of the emerging smooth jazz radio stations at the time. That’s bassist Cliff Hugo doing his best imitation of Jimmy Haslip of the Yellowjackets. The album premiered on the Contemporary Jazz chart July 23 and was still on its ascent.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 12 14

crusaders-1988-life_in_the_modern_world

#13: “Coulda’, Woulda’, Shoulda'” by The Crusaders from the #13 album, Life in the Modern World.  The band was well into its third decade at this point and its popularity was waning. This track  features the usual stellar performances from pianist Joe Sample and the aforementioned Felder. This week, the album’s fifth on the chart, marked its peak.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 13 10

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#9: “The Key to You” by David Benoit from the #9 album, Every Step of the Way. David Pack makes a second appearance on this flashback playlist, this time as songwriter and vocalist on this track which dented the Adult Contemporary chart, peaking at #40. The song was co-written by Benoit, who contributes several piano solos. The album, Benoit’s eleventh, was nominated for a Best Jazz Fusion Performance Grammy award.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 4 22
Billboard 200 129 14
1988 Jazz Year End 15

r-1223750-1201883576-jpeg

#7: “Local Hero” by Yellowjackets from the #7 album, Politics. This was the album’s seventh week on the chart and was still climbing. This album won the Grammy award for Best Jazz Fusion Performance. On their 1992 live album, Live Wires, the band would rename this song “The Dream” and feature Michael Franks on vocals.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 5 20
1988 Jazz Year End 20

simple-pleasures-522bac8f23684

#4: “Drive My Car” by Bobby McFerrin from the #4 album, Simple Pleasures.  A Beatles cover from a huge summer album. The album would hold the #1 spot on the Contemporary Jazz chart for 4 weeks, June 11 – July 8 and later for 6 weeks, October 1 – November 11, but wouldn’t exit the chart until the following May.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 1 54
Billboard 200 5 55
R&B 12 41
1988 Jazz Year End 3

12

#3: “Claire’s Dream” by Spyro Gyra from the #3 album, Rites of Summer. The lead track from the group’s 1988 offering, this track was written by saxophonist/producer Jay Beckenstein. Following this week at #3, the album would spend 4 weeks in the top spot before being ousted by the above McFerrin album.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 1 20
Billboard 200 104 8
1988 Jazz Year End 12

basia_-_time_and_tide_album_cover

#2: “Time and Tide” by Basia from the #2 album, Tide and Tide. The video for this track received some airplay on MTV and boosted the single to several charts: #19 Adult Contemporary, #26 pop. The album spent the month prior to this August 20 chart in the #1 spot. It charted a remarkable 62 consecutive weeks, from February 20, 1988 through April 15, 1989.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 1 62
Billboard 200 36 77
1988 Jazz Year End 2

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#1: “Lesley Ann” by David Sanborn from the #1 album, Close-Up.  In the top spot in only its fifth week on the chart, this would be its only appearance at #1. It would remain on the Contemporary Jazz chart, however, through April 1989. This track features guitarist Hiram Bullock, producer/bassist Marcus Miller, and vocals by Michael Ruff. The album won the Grammy award for Best Pop Instrumental Performance (Orchestra, Group or Soloist).

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 1 40
Billboard 200 59 28
R&B 38 19
1988 Jazz Year End 9

jazzchart


As always, thanks to Herc of Herc’s Hideaway for research assistance and support.

Cranberry Records

In late 1985, MCA Records offered basketball legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar his own jazz imprint, Cranberry Records. Unfortunately, the label never got off the ground. What follows is a documentation of the label’s short life as told through primary sources:



cranberry-7

Billboard, December 28, 1985, p. 71


cranberry-8

Billboard, February 15, 1986, p. 56


cranberry-5

Billboard, February 22, 1986, p. 52


cranberry-4

Billboard, March 22, 1986, p. 60


Untitled

Rolling Stone, April 10, 1986, p. 17


cranberry-3

Billboard, March 21, 1987, p. 31


cranberry-15

Down Beat, April 1987, p. 13


cranberry-2

Billboard, April 4, 1987, p. 33


cranberry-1

Billboard, May 16, 1987, p. 66


cranberry-6

Billboard, July 4, 1987, p. 31


cranberry-9

Billboard, March 5, 1988, p. 59


Ben Sidran interviews Kareem Abdul-Jabbar about jazz. Conversation about Cranberry begins about 6 minutes in:

KAREEM ABDUL JABBAR TALKING JAZZ



Dr. Smooth’s Flashback #5: Billboard chart of October 26, 1985

Spend an hour remembering some of the most popular jazz of Autumn 1985 as listed on the Top Jazz Albums chart in the October 26, 1985 issue of Billboard magazine.

Playlist:


wayne-shorter-atlantis-press-k-486376

#39: “Endangered Species” by Wayne Shorter, from the #39 album of the week, Atlantis. While Atlantis was Shorter’s 16th solo album, it was his first since 1974. During the intervening years, Shorter had mainly recorded as a member of Weather Report. This week marked the album’s debut on the jazz chart. Trivia: the pastel portrait of Shorter on the album cover was composed by actor Billy Dee Williams.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 32 10

wildromance

#38: “It’s All for You” by Herb Alpert, from the #38 album of the week, Wild Romance. The album had debuted on the jazz chart on September 14; this week would mark its last appearance on the jazz chart, although it had a slightly longer run on the Billboard 200.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 35 8
Billboard 200 151 10

51t0krmhovl

#37: “Imagination” by Al Jarreau from the #37 album, High Crime. This album, his fourth with producer Jay Graydon, was released in late 1984 and had debuted on the jazz chart on December 1, 1984. The album was nearing the end of its chart run on this date, having been on the chart for 48 weeks.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 2 53
Billboard 200 49 35
R&B 12 33
1985 Jazz Year End 7

first-circle

#30: “If I Could” by the Pat Metheny Group from the #30 album, First Circle. By this point, this album had been on the jazz chart for 54 weeks, having debuted more than a year earlier. It quickly rose to the #2 position, kept from the top spot by Wynton Marsalis’ Hot House Flowers album. It would retain a spot in the low 30’s on the album chart for a few months before falling off in March 1986. In February 1985, the album won the Grammy award for Best Jazz Fusion Performance.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 2 75
Billboard 200 91 35
1985 Jazz Year End 3

benson

#23: “Beyond the Sea” by George Benson from the #23 album, 20/20. Benson’s big band take on this standard from 1946 was the last track on side one of this album and features Benson on a scat guitar solo, a rarity in the mid-80s. On this week, 20/20 was nearing the end its run on the jazz chart, having debuted back on February 16.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 3 48
Billboard 200 45 32
R&B 20 34
1985 Jazz Year End 5

51uyrbrjd0l

#22: “Smooth Operator” by Sade from the #22 album, Diamond Life. This song was a #5 single on the Billboard Hot 100. This album, the band’s debut, debuted on the jazz chart on March 30 and was enjoying its 31st week on the chart. However, it was nowhere near the end of its chart run, which ultimately ended in June 1986.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 5 66
Billboard 200 5 81
R&B 3 76
1985 Jazz Year End 14

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#20: “Run for Cover” by David Sanborn from the #20 album, Straight from the Heart. Recorded live in studio in front of a small crowd, this album mixes some songs from Sanborn’s earlier albums along with a few covers. The studio version of “Run for Cover” was released in 1981 on Sanborn’s Voyeur album. The song was written by, and features, bassist Marcus Miller. The album was number one on the jazz chart for 6 weeks in late March and April of 1985. In February 1986, the album would win the Grammy award for Best Jazz Fusion Performance.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 74
Billboard 200 64 32
R&B 31 20
1985 Jazz Year End 4

r-395747-1112839368

#17: “Aural Oasis” by Wynton Marsalis from the #17 album, Black Codes (from the Underground).  This post-bop album was the highest charting debut on this October 26 chart. In February 1986, the album would win two Grammy awards: Best Jazz Instrumental Performance, Soloist, and Best Jazz Instrumental Performance Group. Black Codes would go on to spend an incredible 30+ weeks in the top ten of the jazz chart, including 4 weeks at the #2 position (Stanley Jordan’s Magic Touch album was at #1 during those weeks – see #1, below).

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 2 42
Billboard 200 118 10

american-eyes

#14: “Oops!” by Rare Silk from the #14 album, American Eyes. This vocalized cover of Steps Ahead’s “Oops!” leads off this album, the quartet’s second. The album debuted on the jazz chart on April 13; on this date, the album was on its slow chart descent after spending the summer in the chart’s top ten.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 4 44
1985 Jazz Year End 10

earl_klugh-1984-soda_fountain_shuffle

#8: “Moonlight Dancing” by Earl Klugh from the #8 album, Soda Fountain Shuffle. Guitarist Earl Klugh has been a staple on the jazz charts since 1976. This 12th studio album, which debuted on May 11, had peaked on the chart a few months earlier, but was still enjoying top ten status. Klugh wrote and produced all ten songs on the album, including “Moonlight Dancing” which was track 4 on side one.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 3 44
Billboard 200 110 17
R&B 23 21
1985 Jazz Year End 13

600x600

#2: “Love Will Find a Way” by George Howard from the #2 album, Dancing in the Sun. This song, the album’s lead track, is an instrumental cover of a song which original appeared on Lionel Richie’s Can’t Slow Down album. The album debuted on May 11 and had spent the 6 weeks previous to this October 26 chart in the #1 spot. It wouldn’t exit the chart until June 1986.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 62
Billboard 200 169 4
R&B 47 25
1985 Jazz Year End 6

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#1: “The Lady in My Life” by Stanley Jordan from the #1 album, Magic Touch.
This Rod Temperton tune originally closed out Michael Jackson’s Thriller album. Magic Touch was Jordan’s major label debut and spent a remarkable 46 non-consecutive weeks in the #1 spot.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 86
Billboard 200 64 66
R&B 31 61
1985 Jazz Year End 2

bbjaz


As always, thanks to Herc of Herc’s Hideaway for research assistance and support.

Smooth Yacht Flashback

smoothyacht

Is it “smooth jazz”? Is it “yacht rock”? Does it matter?

18 tunes that straddle the fence between the two sub-genres:

Playlist:


igy

Track 1: “I.G.Y. (What a Beautiful World)” by Donald Fagen from the album The Nightfly (1982). Written by Donald Fagen, produced by Gary Katz.

igypalyers

Billboard Single Charts: Peak Weeks
Hot 100 26 14
Adult Contemporary 8 18
Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Billboard 200 11 27
R&B 24 17

 

51aok5bznnl

Track 2: “Breezin'” by George Benson from the album Breezin’ (1976). Written by Bobby Womack, produced by Tommy LiPuma.

George Benson: Lead guitar and vocals
Phil Upchurch: Rhythm guitar
Ronnie Foster: Electric piano and Mini-Moog
Jorge Dalto: Clavinet and piano
Phil Upchurch: Bass
Harvey Mason: Drums
Ralph MacDonald: Percussion

Billboard Single Charts: Peak Weeks
Hot 100 63 6
Adult Contemporary 13 13
R&B 54 9
Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Billboard 200 1 78
Jazz 1 74
R&B 1 46

0664140810624

Track 3: “Come Back to Me” by Tom Scott from the album Target (1983). Written by Tom Scott, Kenny James & Michael Wilk, produced by Tom Scott.

Tom Scott: Saxophone
Kenny James: Lead vocal
Harvey Mason: Drums
Neil Stubenhaus: Bass
Carlos Rios & Paul Jackson: Guitars
Victor Feldman, Ian Underwood, Michael Boddicker: Keyboards
Judi Brown, Clydene Jackson, Jo Ann Harris, Carmen Grillo, Andrea Robinson, Geoffrey Leib, Lynne Scott, Jim Gilstrap, Leza Miller, Rugenia Peoples: Backing vocals

Billboard Single Charts: Peak Weeks
R&B 80 6
Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 9 25

678764_1_f

Track 4: “Minute by Minute” by Larry Carlton from the album Discovery (1987). Written by Michael McDonald and Lester Abrams, produced by Larry Carlton.

discoveryplayers

Billboard Single Charts: Peak Weeks
Adult Contemporary 25 7
Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 34
Billboard 200 180 6

just the two of us

Track 5: “Just the Two of Us” by Grover Washington, Jr. from the album Winelight (1980). Written by Bill Withers, William Salter, and Ralph MacDonald, produced by Grover Washington, Jr. and Ralph MacDonald.

Grover Washington, Jr.: Saxophones
Bill Withers: Vocal
Ralph MacDonald: Percussion
Steve Gadd: Drums
Marcus Miller: Bass
Eric Gale: Guitar
Richard Tee: Fender Rhodes
Bill Eaton: Oberheim synthesizer
Robert Greenide: Steel drums
Hilda Harris, Yvonne Lewis, and Ullanda McCullough: Backing vocals

Billboard Single Charts: Peak Weeks
Hot 100 2 24
Adult Contemporary 2 21
R&B 3 21
Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Billboard 200 5 52
Jazz 1 183
R&B 2 49

61fpj90ktyl

Track 6: “Morning Dance” by Spyro Gyra from the album Morning Dance (1979). Written by Jay Beckenstein, produced by Jay Beckenstein and Richard Calandra.

Jay Beckenstein: Alto saxophone
Jeremy Wall: Electric Piano
John Tropea: Guitars
Jim Kurzdorfer: Bass
Ted Reinhardt: Drums
Rubens Bassini: Congas & percussion
David Samuels: Marimba & Steel Drums

Billboard Single Charts: Peak Weeks
Hot 100 24 15
Adult Contemporary 1 27
R&B 60 8
Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Billboard 200 27 41
Jazz 2 81
R&B 33 33

r-1659549-1247092062-jpeg

Track 7: “We’re in This Love Together” by Al Jarreau from the album Breakin’ Away (1981)Written by Roger Murrah and Keith Stegall, produced by Jay Graydon.

jarreauplayers

Billboard Single Charts: Peak Weeks
Hot 100 15 24
Adult Contemporary 6 23
R&B 6 14
Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Billboard 200 9 103
Jazz 1 143
R&B 1 77

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Track 8: “Back Again” by David Sanborn from the album As We Speak (1981). Written by Don Freeman and Dennis Belfield, produced by Robert Margouleff.

sanbornplayers

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 96
Billboard 200 70 23
R&B 32 22

rit

Track 9: “Is It You?” by Lee Ritenour from the album Rit (1981). Written by Lee Ritenour, Eric Tagg, and Bill Champlin, produced by Lee Ritenour and Harvey Mason.

Lee Ritenour: Guitars
Eric Tagg: Lead vocal
Bill Champlin: Backing vocals
David Foster: Keyboards
Richard Tee: Keyboards
Abraham Laboriel: Bass
Alex Acuna: Drums
Harvey Mason: Percussion
Jerry Hey: Flugelhorn

Billboard Single Charts: Peak Weeks
Hot 100 15 16
Adult Contemporary 15 13
R&B 27 16
Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Billboard 200 26 23
Jazz 4 40
R&B 20 20

rekord-3986

Track 10: “Silk” by Fuse One from the album Silk  (1981). Written by Ndugu, produced by Creed Taylor.

Stanley Turrentine: Tenor Saxophone
Tom Browne: Trumpet
Eric Gale: Guitar
Stanley Clarke: Bass
Ronnie Foster: Keyboards
Todd Cochran: Synthesizer
Ndugu: Drums
Sammy Figueroa: Percussion

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 14 23
Billboard 200 139 8
R&B 44 10

manhattan-transfer-mecca-for-moderns

Track 11: “On the Boulevard” by The Manhattan Transfer from the album Mecca for Moderns (1981). Written by Jay Graydon, Richard Page, and Marc Jordan, produced by Jay Graydon.

boulevard

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 6 27
Billboard 200 22 27

r-588216-1348703666-2323-jpeg

Track 12: “Route 101” by Herb Alpert from the album Fandango (1982). Written by Juan Carlos Calderon, produced by Herb Alpert and Jose Quintana.

Herb Alpert: Trumpet
Marie Cain, Darlene Holden-Hoven, Mary Hylan: Backing vocals
Freddie Washington: Bass
Carlos Vega: Drums
Abraham Laboriel, Tim May, Carlos Rios: Guitars
Michel Colombier and Greg Mathieson: Keyboards, Paulinho DaCosta: Percussion

Billboard Single Charts: Peak Weeks
Hot 100 37 10
Adult Contemporary 4 18
Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Billboard 200 100 26
Jazz 20 34
R&B 52 6

2181562

Track 13: “Sweet Baby” by Stanley Clarke & George Duke from the album The Clarke/Duke Project (1981). Written by George Duke, produced by Stanley Clarke and George Duke.

dukeclarke

Billboard Single Charts: Peak Weeks
Hot 100 19 20
Adult Contemporary 16 15
R&B 6 15
Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Billboard 200 33 23
Jazz 1 38
R&B 7 27

mi0001872969

Track 14: “Dream Hunter” by Sergio Mendes from the album Sergio Mendes (1983). Written by Michael Sembello and Dan Sembello, produced by Sergio Mendes.

sergio

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Billboard 200 27 27
R&B 22 23

20090224223302

Track 15: “What You Won’t Do for Love” by Bobby Caldwell from the album Bobby Caldwell (1978). Written by Alfons Kettner and Bobby Caldwell, produced by Ann Holloway.

Bobby Caldwell: Keyboards, synthesizer, vocals
Richie Valesquez: Bass
Harold Seay: Drums
Steve Mealy: Guitar
Benny Latimore: Keyboards

Billboard Single Charts: Peak Weeks
Hot 100 9 20
Adult Contemporary 10 16
R&B 6 23
Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Billboard 200 21 31
R&B 7 28

atkins_tunedf

Track 16: “The Cricket Ballet” by Chet Atkins from the album Stay Tuned (1985). Written by Darryl Dybka, produced by David Hungate.

atkins

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 12 14
Billboard 200 145 13

tumblr_o1k5bne95e1ubfpk1o1_1280

Track 17: “Human Nature” by Miles Davis from the album You’re Under Arrest (1985). Written by John Bettis and Steve Porcaro, produced by Miles Davis and Robert Irving III.

Miles Davis: Trumpet
John Scofield: Guitar
Vince Wilburn, Jr.: Drums
Robert Irving III: Keyboards
Darryl Jones: Bass

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 3 44
Billboard 200 111 12
R&B 63 5

nwc76e45ea32a147ebb5bf58d13f91da69

Track 18: “One Hundred Ways” by Quincy Jones from the album The Dude (1981). Written by Kathy Wakefield, Ben Wright, and Tony Coleman, produced by Quincy Jones.

aquincy

Billboard Single Charts: Peak Weeks
Hot 100 14 21
Adult Contemporary 5 21
R&B 10 23
Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Billboard 200 10 80
Jazz 3 89
R&B 3 81

Charting the Charts: Ramsey Lewis – Tequila Mockingbird (1977)

chartingthecharts


tequila

Here’s a look at how the Ramsey Lewis album Tequila Mockingbird fared in various publications:

1977-78
Date Billboard Jazz (40) Billboard 200 Cashbox 200
Dec 24 15  150
Dec 31 191
Jan 7 122 186
Jan 14 9 116 179
Jan 21 114 170
Jan 28 5 111 166
Feb 4 111 161
Feb 11 3 183 154
Feb 18 183 148
Feb 25 6 148
Mar 11 6
Mar 25  11
Apr 8  12
Apr 22 20
May 13  25
May 27 40

 


REVIEWS:

ramsey

Rolling Stone Jazz & Blues Album Guide: ★★★
Virgin Encyclopedia of Jazz: ★★★

Dr. Smooth’s Flashback #4: Billboard chart of December 6, 1980

Spend an hour remembering some of the most popular jazz of late Autumn 1980 as listed on the Jazz LPs chart in the December 6, 1980 issue of Billboard magazine.

Playlist:


Turrentine

#47: “Inflation” by Stanley Turrentine, from the #47 album of the week, Inflation.  This album, on the Elektra label was in the latter third of its chart run on this date.  However, his newer release on the Fantasy label, Use the Stairs, was at #33 in the first weeks of its chart run.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 17 38
Billboard 200 209 1
R&B 65 3

zurich

#44: “Bud Powell” by Chick Corea and Gary Burton from the #44 album, In Concert, Zürich, October 28, 1979. This ECM album was premiering on the Jazz Charts this week and would go on to win the Grammy Award for Best Jazz Instrumental Album, Individual or Group.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 23 19

carlton

#38: “Midnight Parade” by Larry Carlton from the #38 album, Strikes Twice. This track is the third track on the album, which was Carlton’s fifth solo release. This week, the album was headed down the charts, having peaked back on the October 4 chart.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 8 22
Billboard 200 138 8

hideaway

#29: “Hideaway” by David Sanborn from the #29 album, Hideaway. The lead and title track from his breakthrough album. Sanborn would remain a staple on the jazz charts throughout his career. By this point, the album was almost halfway from its 86 week chart run.  It was in its 41st week on the chart, having premiered at #18 on March 1.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 2 86
Billboard 200 63 19
R&B 33 14

larsen

#28: “Who’ll Be The Fool Tonight” by the Larsen-Feiten Band from the #28 album, Larsen-Feiten Band. This single by a group of well-known session musicians (led by keyboardist Neil Larsen and guitarist Buzz Feiten) hit #29 in the Billboard Top 40 in October 1980.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 16 12
Billboard 200 142 10

deodato

#20: “East Side Strut” by Deodato from the #20 album, Night Cruiser. The second track on the album, this funk song features bass playing by Gary Grainger. The album debuted at #40 on the chart in late August before peaking at #7 in mid-October.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 7 33
Billboard 200 186 3
R&B 53 8

seawind

#15: “The Two of Us” by Seawind from the #15 album, Seawind.  Seawind was a fusion group from Hawaii; this, their most popular album, was their only release on the A&M label and was produced by George Duke. This west coast/AOR song features vocals by Pauline Wilson and Carl Carlwell on vocals as well as the signature horn licks of Jerry Hey. The album first appeared on the chart on October 11, had peaked in November, and was just starting its move down the charts on this date.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 13 30
Billboard 200 83 11
R&B 20 21

thistime

#11: “Your Sweet Love” by Al Jarreau from the #11 album, This Time. The album, produced by Jay Graydon, moved away from jazz towards a more adult R&B sound. The move was rewarded with chart success. This song again treats us to more Jerry Hey horns along with lots of electric piano from Tom Canning. This album held the #1 spot on the Jazz charts from for 3 weeks in July before being knocked off by The Crusaders’ Rhapsody and Blues.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 82
Billboard 200 27 35
R&B 6 39

browne

#10: “Funkin’ for Jamaica” by Tom Browne from the #10 album, Love Approach. This funk song hit #1 on the R&B charts and #9 on the Disco charts yet didn’t crack the Hot 100.  Vocals provided by Toni Smith. This album held down the #1 spot on the Jazz album chart for just one week, November 8.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 45
Billboard 200 18 26
R&B 1 32

winelight

#6: “Let it Flow (For Dr. J)” by Grover Washington, Jr. from the #6 album, Winelight.  This album would go on to spend 31 weeks at #1 on the jazz charts and yield the #2 pop single “Just the Two of Us,” featuring vocals by Bill Withers.  Washington was from the Philadelphia area and was a huge fan of the 76ers basketball team and often performed the national anthem before games.  This love of the game led him to write this piece for Hall of Famer Julius Irving, star of the 76ers at the time.  Grover’s previous album, Baddest,  a double LP “best of” compilation on the Motown label, was also on this week’s chart, placing at #21.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 183
Billboard 200 5 52
R&B 2 49

carnaval

#2: “Bittersweet” by Spyro Gyra from the #2 album, Carnaval.   This was this particular album’s 5th week on the chart; it spent a total of five weeks at #2 behind George Benson’s Give Me the Night.  The group had two albums on the chart this week, their previous album, Catching the Sun, was at #31 in it’s 37th week on the chart.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 2 34
Billboard 200 49 30
R&B 24 23

benson

#1: “Dinorah, Dinorah” by George Benson from the #1 album, Give Me the Night.
A huge crossover hit on both the pop and R&B charts, this album spent 17 non-consecutive weeks in the #1 spot. Produced by Quincy Jones, this Brazilian composition by Ivan Lins and Vitor Martins features  some familiar names including Herbie Hancock, Patti Austin, Greg Phillinganes, and Jerry Hey (yet again). The album debuted on the Jazz chart on August 9, was at #1 the following week, and stayed on the chart until August of the following year. It also topped the R&B album chart for 4 weeks.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 53
Billboard 200 3 38
R&B 1 37

BB-1980-12-06


As always, thanks to Herc of Herc’s Hideaway for research assistance and support.

Elektra/Musician Releases: August 1984

musician_logo


Chico Freeman – Tangents

60361

R-3420882-1329742273.jpeg

Produced by Chico Freeman & John Koenig
Peak on Billboard Jazz Album Chart: Did not chart

Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide: ★★★
Virgin Encyclopedia of Jazz: ★★★

Bobby McFerrin – The Voice

60366

MI0003511405

Recorded live at concerts in Mannheim, Hamburg, Stuttgart, and Köln, Germany, March 1984
Produced by Linda Goldstein
Peak on Billboard Jazz Album Chart: #24

voicenotes

Album’s liner notes.  Click to enlarge.

Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide: ★★★★
Virgin Encyclopedia of Jazz: ★★★

Steve Morse Band – The Introduction

60369

MI0003501113

Produced by Steve Morse
Peak on Billboard Jazz Album Chart: #15
Peak on the US Billboard Top 200 chart: #101
Peak on Cash Box album chart: #99


Stan Getz & Albert Dailey – Poetry

60370

getz

Produced by Stan Getz
Peak on Billboard Jazz Album Chart: Did not chart

Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide: ★★★
Virgin Encyclopedia of Jazz: ★★★

musician_logo_small For more info on the short life on the Elektra/Musician imprint, click here.

Elektra/Musician Releases: March 1984

musician_logo


Bill Evans – The Paris Concert: Edition Two

60311

evans2

Jazz Masters Edition
Recorded Paris, France, November 26, 1979
Produced by Helen Keane
Peak on Billboard Jazz Album Chart: #37

Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide: ★★★★
Virgin Encyclopedia of Jazz: ★★★

Various Artists – In Performance at The Playboy Jazz Festival

60298

playboy

Recorded at the Hollywood Bowl, June 1982
Produced by Christine Martin
Peak on Billboard Jazz Album Chart: #35

playboynotes

Album’s liner notes. Click to enlarge.

play

Billboard, April 28, 1984, p. 54

Virgin Encyclopedia of Jazz: ★★★

Bill Evans – Living in the Crest of a Wave

60349

billevans

Produced by Bill Evans
Peak on Billboard Jazz Album Chart: #42

billevanswave

Billboard, April 21, 1984, p. 60

Down Beat Magazine: ★★½
Virgin Encyclopedia of Jazz: ★★★

McCoy Tyner – Dimensions

60350

4943674140640

Produced by McCoy Tyner
Peak on Billboard Jazz Album Chart: #43

tyner

Billboard, April 14, 1984, p. 56

Down Beat Magazine: ★★★½
Virgin Encyclopedia of Jazz: ★★★★

Steps Ahead – Modern Times

60351

moderntimes

Produced by Steps Ahead
Peak on Billboard Jazz Album Chart: #11

stepsbb

Billboard, April 14, 1984, p. 56

Down Beat Magazine: ★★★★
Virgin Encyclopedia of Jazz: ★★★★