Dr. Smooth’s Flashback #11: Billboard chart of July 5, 1986

Spend an hour remembering some of the most popular jazz of 1986 as listed on the Top 40 Jazz Albums chart in the July 5, 1986 issue of Billboard magazine.

Playlist:


breakout

#38: “Bob Goes to the Store” by Spyro Gyra, from the #38 album of the week, BreakoutBreakout was the group’s tenth album, released in June, 1986. This chart marked the album’s debut. It would go on to spend two weeks at the #1 spot in late September/early October. “Bob Goes to the Store” is the album’s first track and was written by bass player Kim Stone. The group filmed a promotional video for the song that was later included in a 1990 promotional VHS tape titled Graffiti.

sggraffiti

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 34
Billboard 200 71 19
1986 Jazz Year End 14

perri

#36: “Maybe Tomorrow” by Perrí, from the #36 album of the week, Celebrate. Perrí was a Los Angeles-based vocal group consisting of four sisters: Lori, Sharon, Darlene, and Carolyn Perry. They were discovered by Pat Metheny and later supported Anita Baker on tour. Celebrate was the quartet’s debut album. This issue of Billboard marked the album’s final appearance on the jazz chart; it had debuted on the chart back on March 15.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 14 20
1986 Jazz Year End 48

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#33: “After” by Makoto Ozone, from the #33 album of the week, After.  After was the Japanese pianist’s second solo album. It debuted here in the #33 position on this date and stayed at #33 for the entirety of its chart run. While other tracks feature various sidemen/combos, this track features only Ozone.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 33 4

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#25: “Sandu” by Freddie Hubbard & Woody Shaw from the #25 album, Double Take. This album by two jazz trumpet masters opens with this cover of a Clifford Brown tune.  In addition to Hubbard and Shaw, the track features Kenny Garrett on alto saxophone and Mulgrew Miller on piano. The album debuted on the chart this week at the #25 spot and stayed near that position for its brief chart run.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 19 12

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#21: “Milan” by Ahmad Jamal from the #21 album, Rossiter Road. This Jamal album had debuted on the jazz chart on June 7 and was peaking here at the #21 spot. For this album, Jamal was backed by James Cammack on bass, Herlin Riley on drums, and Manolo Badrena on percussion.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 21 10

shades

#20: “And You Know That” by Yellowjackets from the #20 album, Shades.  At #20, this was the highest debuting album on this particular chart. The track, written by drummer Ricky Lawson and keyboardist Russell Ferrante, won a Grammy Award for “Best R&B Instrumental Performance (Orchestra, Group or Soloist)” and is the album’s lead cut. Track 4 of the album, “Revelation,” features vocals from Perrí (see #36 above).

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 4 32
Billboard 200 195 2
1986 Jazz Year End 16

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#18: “Never As Good As the First Time” by Sade from the #18 album, Promise.  This multi-platinum album debuted on the jazz chart on January 18, had peaked at #4 on March 29, and was on its decline on this date. “Never As Good As the First Time” was the third single released from the album and peaked at #20 pop, #8 R&B, and #6 adult contemporary.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 4 32
Billboard 200 1  46
R&B 1  45
1986 Jazz Year End 10

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#12: “Highland Aire” by Lyle Mays from the #12 album, Lyle Mays. The first solo effort by Pat Metheny Group keyboardist, this album debuted on the jazz chart on May 24 and was peaking here at #12 in its seventh week. Playing with Mays on this album are Alejandro N. Acuña, drums; Billy Drewes, saxophone; Bill Frisell: guitar; Marc Johnson, bass; and Nana Vasconcelos, percussion.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 12 16

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#11: “Majesty” by Cabo Frio from the #11 album, Right on the Money. The fusion group’s second album debuted on the jazz chart on April 12 and was at its peak here at #11. “Majesty” is the album’s 8th track and was written by keyboardist Joey Santora and also features saxophonist Terrance Bruce.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 11 20
1986 Jazz Year End 37

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#5: “Since I Fell for You” by Bob James & David Sanborn from the #5 album, Double Vision. This track, a jazz standard, features vocals by Al Jarreau and won a Grammy award for “Best Jazz Fusion Performance, Vocal or Instrumental,” peaked at #10 on the Billboard Adult Contemporary chart, and was featured in the television show Moonlighting as well as appearing on that show’s compilation. The album debuted on the previous chart at #30 and jumped 25 spots to #5 on this chart. It would spend 8 consecutive weeks in the top spot starting August 2.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 58
Billboard 200 50 64
R&B 16 39
1986 Jazz Year End 7

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#2: “Smiles and Smiles to Go” by Larry Carlton from the #2 album, Alone/But Never AloneThis is the album’s lead track and was written and produced by Carlton. The album debuted on the jazz chart on April 12 and would move from this #2 position to the top spot on the next chart.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 34
Billboard 200 141 11
1986 Jazz Year End 6

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#1: “Love Will Follow” by George Howard from the #1 album, Love Will Follow. This album, which had debuted on March 29, spent 8 consecutive weeks in the #1 spot. This title track is a cover of a Kenny Loggins/Tom Snow song and features Howard on soprano saxophone and Ron Smith on guitar.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 32
Billboard 200 142 11
R&B 22 26
1986 Jazz Year End 3

bbjazz


As always, thanks to Herc of Herc’s Hideaway for research assistance and support.

Dr. Smooth’s Flashback #10: Billboard chart of March 17, 1979

Spend an hour remembering some of the most popular jazz of early 1979 as listed on the Top 40 Jazz Albums chart in the March 17, 1979 issue of Billboard magazine.

Playlist:


larrycarlton

#40: “Nite Crawler” by Larry Carlton, from the #40 album of the week, Larry Carlton. This album is also known as the “Room 335” album as it was recorded at Larry Carlton’s Room 335 Studio in Hollywood. His first solo album released after leaving The Crusaders, this self-titled, self-produced album was in its last week on the jazz chart, having debuted 30 weeks earlier on August 26, 1978. The album features such session artists as Jeff Porcaro (drums), Greg Mathieson (keyboards), Abraham Laboriel (bass), and Paulinho da Costa (percussion).

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 12 30
Billboard 200 174

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#34: “Katherine” by the Jeff Lorber Fusion, from the #34 album of the week, Soft Space. This album was the second album by Lorber as leader of his band The Jeff Lorber Fusion and featured special guest artists Chick Corea (keyboards) and Joe Farrell (reeds). The album was released in 1978 and was on its descent down the jazz chart on this date.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 13 25
1979 Jazz Year End 41

carnival

#31: “Birdland” by Maynard Ferguson, from the #31 album of the week, Carnival. Ferguson’s cover of the Weather Report tune “Birdland” was the centerpiece of this album and quickly became a fan favorite.  Arranged by band trombonist Nick Lane, it features solos by John Qdini (guitar), Eric Traub (sax) and, of course, Maynard himself. By this date, the album had been on the jazz charts for 24 weeks. It had peaked at #9 back on October 21, 1978.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 9 26
Billboard 200 113
1979 Jazz Year End 28

jamal_ahmad_one_101b

#29: “Just the Way You Are” by Ahmad Jamal from the #29 album, One. This cover of the Billy Joel standard is divided into two halves, the first is a simple piano trio treatment followed by a more upbeat fusion arrangement which features Jamal on piano throughout. This was the album’s 13th week on the chart; it had peaked at #21 on the January 6 chart.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 21 15

michael_franks_tiger_in_the_rain_cd

#25: “Tiger in the Rain” by Michael Franks from the #25 album, Tiger in the Rain.  This Franks original finds the singer/songwriter backed by jazz stalwarts Ron Carter (bass), Bucky Pizzarelli (guitar), and Kenny Barron (piano), plus a nice feature of Seldon Powell on soprano saxophone as well as a vibraphone solo from Mike Maineiri.  This issue of Billboard marked the album’s debut on the jazz chart.  It would go on to peak at #6 on April 7.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 6 22
Billboard 200 68
1979 Jazz Year End 32

earl-klugh-magic-in-your-eyes__51wu97ijhll

#22: “Magic in Your Eyes” by Earl Klugh from the #22 album, Magic in Your Eyes. This title track was also the lead cut on the album. The track features Klugh’s acoustic guitar as well as a Fender Rhodes solo from Greg Phillinganes – all atop a string arrangement by Booker T. Jones, who also produced the album. Having debuted in June 1978, this album peaked at #4 on July 1, 1978. This date marked the album’s 41st of 49 weeks on the chart.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 4 49
Billboard 200 139
1979 Jazz Year End 37

feelssogood

#18: “Hide and Seek (Ready or Not Here I Come)” by Chuck Mangione from the #18 album, Feels So Good. This song kicked off side two of the album, which debuted on the jazz chart in the October 22, 1977 edition before sticking around for almost 2 years. This issue marked the album’s 74 consecutive week in the jazz chart, all those weeks in the chart’s top 20 positions.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 98
Billboard 200 2
1979 Jazz Year End 16

pat-metheny-group1

#11: “Phase Dance” by the Pat Metheny Group from the #11 album, Pat Metheny Group.  While Metheny had previously released solo albums, this was the first album attributed to the Pat Metheny Group.  The album had debuted on the jazz chart on August 5, 1978 and was in the first half of its chart run on this date. It had peaked at #5 twice: first on September 30, 1978 and then again February 10, 1979.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 5 71
Billboard 200 123
1979 Jazz Year End 5
1978 Jazz Year End 20

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#4: “Fly” by Al Jarreau from the #14 album, All Fly Home. This song was written by Jarreau and features a solo by Freddie Hubbard. It debuted on the jazz chart on October 21, 1978, peaking at #2 on November 11. It was Jarreau’s highest charting album to date.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 2 37
Billboard 200 78
R&B 27
1979 Jazz Year End 12

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#2: “Touchdown” by Bob James from the #2 album, Touchdown. This track, written by Bob James, features James on pianos (acoustic and electric) and David Sanborn on saxophone, backed by the likes of Steve Gadd and Hiram Bullock. The album had debuted on the December 16 chart and spent 10 consecutive weeks in the #1 spot before dropping to #2 this week.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 47
Billboard 200 37
1979 Jazz Year End 3

500x500

#1: “A Rainy Day in Monterey” by Joe Sample from the #1 album, Carmel. This album, Sample’s most successful, was the fourth solo release from the Jazz Crusaders keyboardist. Written by Sample, it features him throughout on electric piano. The album, which debuted on the February 10 chart, would hold the #1 spot for two consecutive weeks.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 54
Billboard 200 56
R&B 25
1979 Jazz Year End 6

march1779


As always, thanks to Herc of Herc’s Hideaway for research assistance and support.

Dr. Smooth’s Flashback #9: Billboard chart of October 20, 1984

Spend an hour remembering some of the most popular jazz of fall 1984 as listed on the Top 40 Jazz Albums chart in the October 20, 1984 issue of Billboard magazine.

Playlist:


al_jarreau_jarreau_cover

#40: “Step by Step” by Al Jarreau, from the #40 album of the week, Jarreau. By this date, Jarreau had been on the jazz chart for 78 weeks  (it debuted at #18 on April 30, 1983) and would finally leave the chart on November 17. This album would rest in the top position for 16 consecutive weeks, May 14-September 10, 1983. It is listed below as #10 on the 1984 year end chart, but was ranked at #2 on the 1983 year end chart.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 81
Billboard 200 13 43
R&B 4 43
1984 Jazz Year End 10

51wxqbthsml-_sy300_

#38: “Samba Dees Days” by Stan Getz & Charlie Byrd, from the #38 album of the week, Jazz Samba. This album was originally released in 1962, started the bossa nova craze in the US, and hit #1 on the pop chart. It was included in an August 1984 series of Verve reissues by Polygram. This particular tune was written by Byrd, the remaining songs on the album were written by Brazilian composers, including Antonio Carlos Jobim. This was the reissue’s third of 15 weeks on the jazz charts.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz (1984) 22 15
Billboard 200 (1962) 1 70

imaginethis

#36: “The Shadow of Your Smile” by Pieces of a Dream, from the #36 album of the week, Imagine This. This was the group’s third album and, after peaking at #4 back in February, was making its final chart appearance this week. This tune, also known as “Love Theme from The Sandpiper,” was written by Johnny Mandel and premiered in 1965. At that time, it won the Grammy Award for Song of the Year and the Academy Award for Best Original Song.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 4 40
Billboard 200 90 15
R&B 16 40
1984 Jazz Year End 12

first-circle

#27: “Yolanda, You Learn” by the Pat Metheny Group from the #27 album, First Circle. This week marked the chart debut of First Circle. The album would stay on the jazz chart until March 1986 and win the Grammy Award for “Best Jazz Fusion Performance.” It spent 6 weeks at in the #2 position, held out of the top spot by Wynton Marsalis’ Hot House Flowers album. On this date, Metheny had another album on the jazz charts: Rejoicing was at #18.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 2 75
Billboard 200 91 35
1985 Jazz Year End 3

cover

#26: “Love Theme from ‘London and Davis in New York'” by Chuck Mangione from the #26 album, Disguise. Mangione’s chart appearances were in decline by this point in his career and, to that end, that cover photo may have been a poor choice to boost sales. In its fifth week on the jazz chart, it peaked here at #26. This track was a theme for a failed CBS TV pilot starring Richard Crenna as a crime-solving photographer.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 26 11
Billboard 200 148 8

ronstadt_whatsnew

#23: “Someone to Watch Over Me” by Linda Ronstadt from the #23 album, What’s New. A jazz standard on the first of three Ronstadt albums in which she teamed with legendary orchestra leader Nelson Riddle to record selections from the American songbook. A big seller on multiple charts, this album debuted on the jazz chart in December 1983. The beautiful ballad “Someone to Watch Over Me” was composed by George Gershwin with lyrics by brother Ira Gershwin for the 1926 musical Oh, Kay!

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 5 60
Billboard 200 3 81
1984 Jazz Year End 7

banded_together

#22: “Sunset Drivers” by Lee Ritenour from the #22 album, Banded Together. This pop album was released in an attempt to recapture the minor pop chart success Ritenour had with 1981’s Rit album. It didn’t fare as well; this particular week marked the album’s 17th week on the jazz chart and was on a fast descent after peaking at #6. Eric Tagg provides vocals on this track.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 6 20
Billboard 200 145 8
1984 Jazz Year End 39

moderntimes

#19: “Now You Know” by Steps Ahead from the #19 album, Modern TimesSteps Ahead were a jazz “supergroup” consisting of Warren Bernhardt (keyboards), Eddie Gomez (bass), Peter Erskine (drums), Michael Brecker (sax), and Mike Mainieri (vibes) that attempted to pick up where Weather Report left off. This album, on the short-lived Elektra/Musician label, had peaked at #11 in September.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 11 39
1984 Jazz Year End 27

r-5249006-1388696858-9966-jpeg

#17: “Take It From the Top” by Earl Klugh from the #17 album, Wishful Thinking. This album held the top spot on the jazz chart for two weeks in July, 1984. The album’s follow-up, Night Songs, would debut on the chart following this one, November 3. This track is uncharacteristic of Klugh in that it utilizes a big band; it was used as the theme for CBS Sports’ PGA Tour coverage from 1985 through 1990.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 47
Billboard 200 69 23
R&B 18 27
1984 Jazz Year End 6

large

#8: “It’s All Right With Me” by Frank Sinatra from the #8 album, L.A. is My Lady. Sinatra’s final solo album, it attempted to do for Los Angeles what his earlier “Theme from ‘New York, New York'” did for NYC. The album sessions were filmed, with a small audience, and released as Frank Sinatra: Portrait of an Album. “It’s All Right With Me” was written by Cole Porter for his 1953 musical Can-Can.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 8 21
Billboard 200 58 13

backstreet

#3: “I Told U So” by David Sanborn from the #3 album, Backstreet. By this date, the album had been in the jazz chart 48 weeks, had held the #1 spot 14 weeks, and was on its way to being listed as the chart’s top album of the year. This track, the album’s first cut, was written by Sanborn with guitarist Hiram Bullock.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 70
Billboard 200 81 33
R&B 21 47
1984 Jazz Year End 1

r-1764379-1325292820-jpeg

#1: “Old San Juan” by Spyro Gyra from the #1 album, Access All Areas.  This 2 LP set was recorded in Gainesville, St. Petersburg, and Orlando, Florida, November 17-19, 1983. It debuted on the jazz chart on July 7 and spent September 1 – November 10 in the top spot. When the album was released on a CD, the album’s first track, “Old San Juan” was cut so the album could be released on a single CD. Years later, the band released an unedited version of the track as a download from their website. It is that version that caps off this flashback mix.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 37
Billboard 200 59 19
R&B 41 13
1984 Jazz Year End 11

bbjazzchart


As always, thanks to Herc of Herc’s Hideaway for research assistance and support.

Dr. Smooth’s Flashback #8: Columbia albums 1980

The inspiration for this Flashback is the inner sleeve Columbia Records used for their vinyl jazz/R&B releases in 1980.

img_3450

img_3451

Playlist:


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Track 1: “Razor” by The David Chesky Band, from the album Rush Hour.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 48 4

chesky

Produced by David Chesky
Keyboards – David Chesky
Bass – James (Fish) Benjamin
Congas, Percussion – Steve Kroon
Drums – Brian Brake
Guitar – Bill Washer, Joe Beck
Piano – Bob James
Violin, Lyricon – Michał Urbaniak
Flute – Mauricio Smith
Soprano Saxophone – Arnie Lawrence
Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Flute, Piccolo, Soprano Saxophone – Lou Marini
Baritone Saxophone, Flute, Soprano Saxophone – Roger Rosenberg
Tenor Saxophone – Mike Brecker
Tenor Saxophone, Flute – Sal Nistico
Trombone – Clint Sharman, Keith O’QuinnBass
Trombone – Dave Taylor
Trumpet – Danny Cahn, John Eckert, John Gatchell, Randy Brecker, Bob Millikan
Vocals – Jon Lind, Maurice White
Rolling Stone Jazz & Blues Album Guide: not listed
Virgin Encyclopedia of Jazz: not lsited

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Track 2: “Whisper Zone” by Ramsey Lewis, from the album Routes.  

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 7 36
Billboard 200 173 8
R&B 51 7

lewis

Produced by Larry Dunn
Piano – Ramsey Lewis
Bass – Byron Miller
Drums – Ndugu Chancler
Electric Piano – Larry Dunn, Ramsey Lewis
Flugelhorn – Rahm Lee
Guitar – Al McKay
Percussion – Fred White, Paulinho Da Costa, Phillip Bailey
Saxophone – Donald Myrick
Trombone – Louis Satterfield
Trumpet – Michael Davis

Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide: ★★★
Virgin Encyclopedia of Jazz: ★★★

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Track 3: “Family” by Hubert Laws, from the album Family.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 5 37
Billboard 200 133 13

laws

Produced by Hubert Laws
Flute, Piccolo, Backing Vocals – Hubert Laws
Vocals – Debra Laws
Backing Vocals – Angel Rogers
Bass – Nathan East
Drums – Leon “Ndugu” Chancler
Guitar – David T. Walker, Ron Muldrow
Piano – Bobby Lyle

Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide: not listed
Virgin Encyclopedia of Jazz: not listed

georgedukebrazilianloveaffairfront

Track 4: “I Need You Now” by George Duke, from the album A Brazilian Love Affair.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 4 25
Billboard 200 119 9
R&B 40 13

duke

Produced by George Duke
Electric Piano, Second Lead Vocals, Synthesizer, Vibes – George Duke
First Lead Vocals – Simone
Bass – Byron Miller
Percussion – Sheila Escovedo
Drums – Ricky Lawson
Electric Guitar – Roland Bautista
Flugelhorn Solo – Jerry Hey
Vocals – Josie James, Lynn Davis

Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide: ★★★
Virgin Encyclopedia of Jazz: ★★★

liebman

Track 5: “A Dance for Your Thoughts” by David Liebman, from the album What It Is.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Did not chart

dliebman

Produced by Mike Mainieri
Saxophone – David Liebman
Bass – Marcus Miller
Congas – Don Alias
Drums – Steve Gadd
Piano – Kenny Kirkland
Guitar – John Scofield

Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide: not listed
Virgin Encyclopedia of Jazz: not listed

hands

Track 6: “Just Around the Corner” by Herbie Hancock, from the album, Mr. Hands.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 4 31
Billboard 200 117 6
R&B 46 11

handsss

Produced by David Rubinson & Friends, Inc. and Herbie Hancock
Keyboards – Herbie Hancock
Bass – Freddie Washington
Drums – Alphonse Mouzon
Guitar – Wah Wah Watson
Percussion – Sheila Escovedo

Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide: ★★★★
Virgin Encyclopedia of Jazz: ★★★

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Track 7: “Spanish Eyes” by Al Di Meola, from the album Splendido Hotel.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 8 27
Billboard 200 119 14

aldi

Produced by Al Di Meola
Guitar – Al Di Meola
Bass – Anthony Jackson
Drums – Steve Gadd
Electric Guitar – Les Paul

Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide: ★★★★
Virgin Encyclopedia of Jazz: ★★★★

51zzewq8byl

Track 8: “You/Me Together” by Stanley Clarke, from the album Rocks, Pebbles and Sand.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 5 23
Billboard 200 95 11
R&B 40 15

clarke

Produced by Stanley Clarke
Vocals, Bass – Stanley Clarke
Vocals – Marcy Levy
Drums, Percussion – Simon Phillips
Guitar – Charles Johnson
Keyboards –  Steve Bach

Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide: ★★★
Virgin Encyclopedia of Jazz: ★★

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Track 9: “Star” by Maynard Ferguson, from the album It’s My Time.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 23 10
Billboard 200 188 2

maynard

Produced by Bert De Coteaux
Trumpet – Maynard Ferguson
Guitar – Tom Rizzo
Bass – Lou Carfa
Drums – Roberto Petaccia
Keyboards – David Ramsay
Percussion  – Jimmy Maelen
Alto Saxophone, Soprano Saxophone, Flute – Mike Migliore
Baritone Saxophone, Flute, Alto Flute – Ed Maina
Tenor Saxophone, Soprano Saxophone, Flute – Eric Traub
Trombone– Nick Lane, Ken Crane
Trumpet – Alan Wise, Mike Horbal, Rusty Barker, Stan Mark
Vocals – Deborah McDuffie, Krystal Davis, Yvonne Lewis

Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide: not listed
Virgin Encyclopedia of Jazz: ★★

jbrack

Track 10: “Beagle’s Boogie” by Joanne Brackeen, from the album Ancient Dynasty.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 35 4

brackeen

Produced by Bob James & Joe Jorgensen
Piano – JoAnne Brackeen
Bass – Eddie Gomez
Drums – Jack DeJohnette
Saxophone – Joe Henderson

Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide: ★★★★
Virgin Encyclopedia of Jazz: ★★★

rodney

Track 11: “Windy City” by Rodney Franklin from his self-titled album.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 12 30
Billboard 200 207 1
R&B 62 3

franklin

Produced by Thomas C. Washington
Piano – Rodney Franklin
Bass – Nathan East
Drums – Tony St. James
Guitar – Phil Upchurch
Percussion –  Paulinho Da Costa
Vocals – Audrey Franklin, Carmen Twillie, Marti McCall, Phyllis St. James

Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide: ★★
Virgin Encyclopedia of Jazz: ★★★

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Track 12: “I Can’t Stop” by Patti Austin, from the album Body Language.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 28 9
Billboard 200 208 2
R&B 62 4

patti

Produced by Creed Taylor
Vocals – Patti Austin
Backing Vocals – Ava Aldridge, Cindy Richardson, Marie Tomlinson Clark
Bass – David Hood
Drums – Roger Hawkins
Engineer – Steve Melton
Guitar – Duncan Cameron, Jimmy Johnson
Keyboards – Jeremy Wall, Randy McCormick
Percussion – Mickey Buckins
Alto Saxophone – Jerry Dodgion
Saxophone – Michael Brecker
Trombone – Jim Pugh
Trumpet – Randy Brecker

Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide: not listed
Virgin Encyclopedia of Jazz: ★★★

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Track 13: “Touch of Silk” by Eric Gale from the album Touch of Silk.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 12 31
Billboard 200 201 5

ericgale

Produced by Allen R. Toussaint
Guitar – Eric Gale
Bass – David Barard
Drums – James Black
Keyboards – Allen R. Toussaint
Percussion – Kenneth Williams

Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide: not listed
Virgin Encyclopedia of Jazz: ★★

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Track 14: “Carespin’ with Mamie” by Arthur Blythe, from the album Illusions.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 32 8

blythe

Produced by Arthur Blythe and Jim Fishel
Alto Saxophone – Arthur Blythe
Cello – Abdul Wadud
Drums – Bobby Battle
Electric Guitar – James Blood Ulmer
Tuba – Bob Stewart

Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide: ★★★★★
Virgin Encyclopedia of Jazz: ★★★★

hancoc_herb_monster_101b

Track 15: “Making Love” by Herbie Hancock, from the album Monster.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 3 29
Billboard 200 94 18
R&B 19 24

hancock

Produced by David Rubinson & Friends, Inc. and Herbie Hancock
Keyboards – Herbie Hancock
Vocals – Greg Walker
Backing Vocals – The Waters (Julia, Luther, Maxine, Oren)
Bass – Freddie Washington
Drums – Alphonse Mouzon
Guitar – Wah Wah Watson
Percussion – Sheila Escovedo

Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide:
Virgin Encyclopedia of Jazz: ★★

r-418126-1349602966-4812-jpeg

Track 16: “Brighton by the Sea” by Bob James, from the album H.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 3 44
Billboard 200 47 18

bobjamesh

Produced by Bob James
Piano, Electric Piano, Synthesizer – Bob James
Soprano Saxophone – Grover Washington, Jr.
Bass – Gary King
Drums – Buddy Williams
Electric Guitar – Hiram Bullock

Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide:
Virgin Encyclopedia of Jazz: ★★★

As always, thanks to Herc of Herc’s Hideaway for research assistance and support.

Columbia’s Jingle Bell Jazz, 1980 re-release

Jingle Bell Jazz is a collection of jazz versions of Christmas songs recorded between 1959 and 1962 by some of the most popular artists on the Columbia label. It was first issued October 17, 1962. The album was reissued twice on LP, in 1973 and 1980, with a track alteration and different cover art. These reissues replace side 2, track 3, originally “Frosty the Snowman” by The Dukes of Dixieland, with “Deck the Halls” by Herbie Hancock, recorded in 1969.

jingle-bell-jazz-500

Playlist:


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Side one, track one:

jinglebells


Side one, track two:

whitechristmas


Side one, track three:

winterwonderland


Side one, track four:

christmassong


Side one, track five:

rudolph


Side one, track six:

we3


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Side two, track one:

santabrubeck

 


Side two, track two:

deck1


Side two, track three:

deck


Side two, track four:

bell


Side two, track five:

marlowe


Side two, track six:

miles


credits1


Dr. Smooth’s Flashback #7: Cash Box Jazz album chart of March 6, 1982

Spend an hour remembering some of the most popular jazz of late winter 1982 as listed on the Top 30 Jazz Albums chart in the March 6, 1982 issue of Cash Box magazine.

Playlist:


patti

#30: “Baby, Come to Me” by Patti Austin with James Ingram, from the #30 album of the week, Every Home Should Have One. This smooth single was written by Rod Temperton and produced by Quincy Jones, the duo that would bring the world Michael Jackson’s Thriller album later in the year. It was released without much impact in the spring of ’82, but was re-released in October after being feature on the soap opera General Hospital and became a huge hit on the pop, adult contemporary and R&B charts. The immediately recognizable voice of Michael McDonald sings back up on the chorus. Patti, the goddaughter of Quincy Jones, was the first signee to his new label, Qwest and this album was one of the label’s first releases. This was the album’s last of 19 weeks on the jazz chart.

Cash Box Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Top 200 Albums 55 25

miles_davis_the_man_with_the_horn

#29: “The Man With the Horn” by Miles Davis, from the #29 album of the week, The Man With the Horn. This title track, a tribute to Davis himself (“His music sets the pace but masters never have to race”), features lead vocals by Randy Hall and trumpet work by Miles filtered through some sort of wa-wa synthesizer throughout. The album, Davis’s first new release since 1975 following a six-year reclusive retirement, was not well-received by critics but spent over 30 weeks on the Cash Box jazz chart, peaking at #1 back around September, 1981.

Cash Box Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Top Albums 40 16

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#28: “It’s for You” by Pat Metheny & Lyle Mays, from the #28 album of the week, As Falls Wichita, So Falls Wichita Falls. Side one of this album features the  epic 20 minute title track; this song from side two, however, became one of the more popular cuts on the album, having later been covered by several artists and appearing in the 1985 Kevin Costner movie, Fandango. The album is notable as one of the few albums in which Metheny, in addition to his signature guitar work, also plays bass. The album had peaked on the chart at #2 in August, 1981.

Cash Box Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Top Albums 61 20

freetime

#21: “Telluride” by Spyro Gyra from the #21 album, Freetime. This cut from the group’s 1981 album features mallet work by Dave Samuels and a saxophone solo from band leader/composer/producer Jay Beckenstein. The album, the group’s fifth, had peaked at #3 in early October, 1981.

Cash Box Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Top Albums 40 29

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#19: “Segue/There’s a Way” by Ronnie Laws from the #19 album, Solid Ground. The second and third tracks on Laws’ 1981 album. “There’s a Way” features vocals and sax work by Laws. After attending Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches, Texas, Laws was briefly a member of Earth, Wind & Fire and the influence of Maurice White is evident on this track. This album was Laws’ sixth solo effort and had previously peaked at #5 on the jazz albums chart.

Cash Box Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Top Albums 55 22

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#15: “Valdez in the Country” by the Ernie Watts from the #15 album, Chariots of Fire. This cover of a 1973 Donny Hathaway instrumental leads off side two of this album, Watts’ first solo album on the aforementioned Qwest label. In addition to tenor sax work from Watts, the track features a synth solo by Don Grusin and trumpet arrangements by studio legend Jerry Hey. Half of the album’s eight tracks are covers of music from Vangelis’ soundtrack to Chariots of Fire.

qwest

Cash Box Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Top Albums 156 9

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#10: “Sleepwalk” by Larry Carlton from the #10 album, Sleepwalk. This title track is a cover of the instrumental by Santo & Johnny that hit #1 in 1959. The song features Carlton on his  Valley Arts Stratocaster and was released as a single and briefly placed on the adult contemporary charts in ’82.

Cash Box Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Top Albums 88 10

ponty

#9: “As” by Jean-Luc Ponty from the #9 album, Mystical AdventuresThe third consecutive cover on this compilation is fusion cover of Stevie Wonder’s “As.” The song features solos by Ponty on electric violin and Jamie Glaser on guitar; Ponty also tries his hand at the vocoder. The bass player on this cut is Randy Jackson, who would go on to become a judge on American Idol.

Cash Box Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Top Albums 68 15

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#8: “Time to Say Goodbye” by Angela Bofill from the #8 album, Something About You. The ballad, written by Bofill, closed this 1981 album, produced by Narada Michael Walden. It was selected as the B-side for two of the album’s three singles. Like our previous Ponty cut, this song features Randy Jackson on bass. On this date, the album had been on the jazz album chart for 17 weeks and had begun its descent from a peak at #5.

Cash Box Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Top Albums 66 26

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#5: “Twinkle” by Earl Klugh from the #5 album, Crazy for You. This upbeat piece features Klugh on acoustic guitar, Paulinho Da Costa on percussion, and Louis Johnson (of The Brothers Johnson) on bass. Klugh solos on guitar and Greg Phillinganes contributes an electric piano solo. The album, Klugh’s eighth, had earlier peaked at #3 in late January.

Cash Box Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Top Albums 59 26

gbc

#2: “Turn Your Love Around” by George Benson from the #2 album, The George Benson Collection. This hit single, the lead track from the 1981 greatest hits 2 LP set was written by Bill Champlin of Chicago, guitarist Steve Lukather of Toto and producer/guitarist Jay Graydon. The song won a Grammy award for Best R&B Song. The album, which earlier spent 5 weeks in the #1 spot, was a compilation of Benson’s best work from the years 1969-1981.

Cash Box Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Top Albums 17 30

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#1: “Jamming” by Grover Washington, Jr. from the #1 album, Come Morning.  This cover of a 1977 Bob Marley tune smooths out the original’s reggae lilt and opened side two of the album. The album features an all-star cast of musicians including Steve Gadd, Marcus Miller, Richard Tee, and Eric Gale. This chart marked the album’s fifth consecutive week in the top position. The song was released as a single b/w “East River Drive.”

jamming

Cash Box Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Top Albums 31 27

cash-box-jazz


As always, thanks to Herc of Herc’s Hideaway for research assistance and support.

Dr. Smooth’s Flashback #6: Billboard Contemporary Jazz chart of August 20, 1988

Spend an hour remembering some of the most popular jazz of late summer 1988 as listed on the Top Contemporary Jazz Albums chart in the August 20, 1988 issue of Billboard magazine.

Playlist:


shaw

#25: “Put It Where You Want It” by George Shaw and Jetstream, from the #25 album of the week, Skywalkers. This classic Crusaders tune was the lead track from this covers album; that’s the Crusaders’ Wilton Felder on saxophone. The album had premiered on the Contemporary Jazz chart on July 9; this week marked its final appearance.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 19 8

take6

#24: “Spread Love” by Take 6, from the #24 album of the week, Take 6. The a capella gospel album premiered on the chart this week before having a surprising ten week. The album spent 2 full years on a Billboard chart that went through 3 names during those two years: “Spiritual,” “Inspirational,” and, finally, “Contemporary Christian.” The album won a Grammy award for Best Soul Gospel Performance by a Duo or Group, Choir or Chorus while this song won for Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Duo or Group.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 19 10
Billboard 200 71 19
R&B 41 22
Spiritual/Inspirational 3 104

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#23: “River Song” by Dave Grusin and Don Grusin, from the #23 album of the week, Sticks and Stones.  Keyboardists Dave and younger brother Don put out this album on Dave’s GRP label (Dave is the G in GRP). This album only charted for 2½ months, but Dave was too busy to mind – he won the best original score Oscar in 1988 for his soundtrack to The Milagro Beanfield War.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 14 10

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#22: “Nothing Can Come Between Us” by Sade from the #22 album, Stronger Than Pride. This was a successful single from a huge album – the single peaked at #3 R&B and #21 Adult Contemporary. Despite the fact that only lead singer Sade Adu appears on the album covers, the label and musicians insist that Sade is a band name.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 21 12
Billboard 200 7 45
R&B 3 44

download

#19: “Smoke Gets in Your Eyes” by Patti Austin from the #19 album, The Real Me. This album, Austin’s seventh, consists mainly of standards updated with modern arrangements. This cut was written by composer Jerome Kern and lyricist Otto Harbach for the 1933 musical Roberta. This version was arranged and produced by David Pack (Ambrosia) and features sax work from Ernie Watts.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 7 16
R&B 56 14

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#16: “Los Cabos” by the Rippingtons from the #16 album, Kilimanjaro. The band’s second album, this album had debuted on the Contemporary Jazz chart at #9 on April 30; it was near the end of its chart run on this date.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 3 20
Billboard 200 110 15
1988 Jazz Year End 14

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#14: “The Power of Suggestion” by Richard Elliot from the #14 album, The Power of Suggestion. The title track from this instrumental pop album was featured on many of the emerging smooth jazz radio stations at the time. That’s bassist Cliff Hugo doing his best imitation of Jimmy Haslip of the Yellowjackets. The album premiered on the Contemporary Jazz chart July 23 and was still on its ascent.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 12 14

crusaders-1988-life_in_the_modern_world

#13: “Coulda’, Woulda’, Shoulda'” by The Crusaders from the #13 album, Life in the Modern World.  The band was well into its third decade at this point and its popularity was waning. This track  features the usual stellar performances from pianist Joe Sample and the aforementioned Felder. This week, the album’s fifth on the chart, marked its peak.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 13 10

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#9: “The Key to You” by David Benoit from the #9 album, Every Step of the Way. David Pack makes a second appearance on this flashback playlist, this time as songwriter and vocalist on this track which dented the Adult Contemporary chart, peaking at #40. The song was co-written by Benoit, who contributes several piano solos. The album, Benoit’s eleventh, was nominated for a Best Jazz Fusion Performance Grammy award.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 4 22
Billboard 200 129 14
1988 Jazz Year End 15

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#7: “Local Hero” by Yellowjackets from the #7 album, Politics. This was the album’s seventh week on the chart and was still climbing. This album won the Grammy award for Best Jazz Fusion Performance. On their 1992 live album, Live Wires, the band would rename this song “The Dream” and feature Michael Franks on vocals.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 5 20
1988 Jazz Year End 20

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#4: “Drive My Car” by Bobby McFerrin from the #4 album, Simple Pleasures.  A Beatles cover from a huge summer album. The album would hold the #1 spot on the Contemporary Jazz chart for 4 weeks, June 11 – July 8 and later for 6 weeks, October 1 – November 11, but wouldn’t exit the chart until the following May.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 1 54
Billboard 200 5 55
R&B 12 41
1988 Jazz Year End 3

12

#3: “Claire’s Dream” by Spyro Gyra from the #3 album, Rites of Summer. The lead track from the group’s 1988 offering, this track was written by saxophonist/producer Jay Beckenstein. Following this week at #3, the album would spend 4 weeks in the top spot before being ousted by the above McFerrin album.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 1 20
Billboard 200 104 8
1988 Jazz Year End 12

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#2: “Time and Tide” by Basia from the #2 album, Tide and Tide. The video for this track received some airplay on MTV and boosted the single to several charts: #19 Adult Contemporary, #26 pop. The album spent the month prior to this August 20 chart in the #1 spot. It charted a remarkable 62 consecutive weeks, from February 20, 1988 through April 15, 1989.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 1 62
Billboard 200 36 77
1988 Jazz Year End 2

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#1: “Lesley Ann” by David Sanborn from the #1 album, Close-Up.  In the top spot in only its fifth week on the chart, this would be its only appearance at #1. It would remain on the Contemporary Jazz chart, however, through April 1989. This track features guitarist Hiram Bullock, producer/bassist Marcus Miller, and vocals by Michael Ruff. The album won the Grammy award for Best Pop Instrumental Performance (Orchestra, Group or Soloist).

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 1 40
Billboard 200 59 28
R&B 38 19
1988 Jazz Year End 9

jazzchart


As always, thanks to Herc of Herc’s Hideaway for research assistance and support.