Dr. Smooth’s Flashback #17: Billboard/Cash Box/Record World charts of June 21, 1980

Spend an hour remembering some of the most popular jazz of 1980 as listed on the Top 40 Jazz Albums charts in the June 21, 1980 issues of Billboard, Cash Box, and Record World magazines.

Playlist:


thistime

Track 1: “Never Givin’ Up” by Al Jarreau, from the album This Time. Written by Al Jarreau and Ron Canning, produced by Jay Graydon.

Jazz Album Charts: June 21, 1980
Billboard
Cash Box 20
Record World 10

ronnielaws

Track 2: “Every Generation” by Ronnie Laws, from the album Every Generation. Written and produced by Ronnie Laws.

Jazz Album Charts: June 21, 1980
Billboard 17
Cash Box 10
Record World 14

rfdh

Track 3: “Back Together Again” by Roberta Flack featuring Donny Hathaway from the album Roberta Flack featuring Donny Hathaway. Written by James Mtume and Reggie Lucas, produced by Roberta Flack and Eric Mercury.

Jazz Album Charts: June 21, 1980
Billboard 10
Cash Box
Record World

51zzewq8byl

Track 4: “All Hell Broke Loose” by Stanley Clarke, from the album Rocks, Pebbles and Sand. Written and produced by Stanley Clarke.

Jazz Album Charts: June 21, 1980
Billboard 16
Cash Box 15
Record World 6

earlklugh

Track 5: “Spellbound” by Earl Klugh, from the album Dream Come True. Written and produced by Earl Klugh.

Jazz Album Charts: June 21, 1980
Billboard 8
Cash Box 5
Record World 12

mikeyf

Track 6: “Baseball” by Michael Franks from the album One Bad Habit. Written by Michael Franks, produced by Tommy LiPuma and Andre Fischer.

Jazz Album Charts: June 21, 1980
Billboard 7
Cash Box 4
Record World 8

georgedukebrazilianloveaffairfront

Track 7: “Brazilian Sugar” by George Duke, from the album A Brazilian Love Affair. Written and produced by George Duke.

Jazz Album Charts: June 21, 1980
Billboard 6
Cash Box 9
Record World 4

hideaway

Track 8: “Carly’s Song” by David Sanborn, from the album HideawayWritten by David Sanborn, produced by Michael Colina.

Jazz Album Charts: June 21, 1980
Billboard 4
Cash Box 7
Record World 3

hancoc_herb_monster_101b

Track 9: “Stars in Your Eyes” by Herbie Hancock, from the album Monster. Written by Gavin Christopher, Herbie Hancock, Lisa Capuano and Ray Parker, Jr., produced by David Rubinson & Friends.

Jazz Album Charts: June 21, 1980
Billboard 3
Cash Box 6
Record World 5

groves

Track 10: “Snake Eyes” by Grover Washington, Jr., from the album Skylarkin’. Written and produced by Grover Washington, Jr.

Jazz Album Charts: June 21, 1980
Billboard 5
Cash Box 2
Record World 1

sgcts

Track 11: “Catching the Sun” by Spyro Gyra from the album Catching the Sun. Written by Jay Beckenstein, produced by Jay Beckenstein and Richard Calandra.

Jazz Album Charts: June 21, 1980
Billboard 1
Cash Box 1
Record World 2

 

Dr. Smooth’s Flashback #16: Radio & Records Jazz Radio National Airplay album chart of June 18, 1982

Spend an hour remembering some of the most popular jazz of 1982 as listed on the Jazz Radio National Airplay chart in the June 18, 1982 issue of Radio & Records magazine.

The jazz chart had premiered in the May 21, 1982 issue:rrjazzz

Playlist:


51dQH9w6AXL._SX355_

#29: “Common Ground” by Judy Roberts, from the #29 album of the week, Nights in Brazil. Written by Ivan Lins, John Guth, Michael Holmes, and Paul Winter; produced by Judy Roberts and Andy Waterman. The album spent 5 weeks on the R&R chart, peaking at #16: this would be its last week on the chart, having first charted when the chart premiered on May 21.

  • Judy Roberts – Vocals, keyboards
  • Neal Saroka – Guitar
  • David Derge – Drums, percussion
  • Michael Fiorino – Bass

916upqng9fl._sx522_

#24: “On Second Thought” by Nightwind, from the #24 album of the week, A Casual Romance. Written by Jeff Hull; produced by Charles Black, Jeff Hull, Peter Lewis, and Bill Stilfield. Debuting on this week’s chart, the album would eventually spend 10 weeks on the R&R jazz chart, peaking at #15 on July 2.

  • Charles Black – Reeds, percussion
  • Jeff Hull – Drums
  • Barry Coates – Guitars
  • Rich Eames – Keyboards
  • Steve Anderson – Bass
  • John Mandel – Percussion, mallets

r-2545343-1524147029-5868.jpeg

#21: “Love Duet” by Michael Franks, from the #21 album of the week, Objects of Desire. Written by Michael Franks; produced by Michael Colina and Ray Bardani. The album spent 7 weeks on the R&R chart, peaking at #14 on the May 21 chart.

  • Michael Franks, Renee Diggs – Vocals
  • Francisco Centeno – Bass
  • Harvey Mason – Drums
  • Hugh McCracken – Guitar
  • Rob Mounsey, Michael Colina – Keyboards
  • Victor Feldman, Ray Bardani – Percussion
  • David Sanborn – Saxophone

2384308

#20: “East River Drive” by Grover Washington, Jr. from the #20 album, Come Morning. Written by Grover Washington, Jr.; produced by Grover Washington, Jr. and Ralph MacDonald. The album spent 6 weeks on the R&R chart, peaking at #10 on the May 21 chart.

  • Grover Washington, Jr. – Saxophone
  • Ralph MacDonald – Percussion
  • Steve Gadd – Drums
  • Marcus Miller – Bass
  • Richard Tee – Fender Rhodes
  • Eric Gale – Guitar
  • Paul Griffin – Synthesizer

r-1583522-1318555545.jpeg

#15: “Margarita” by Herb Alpert from the #15 album, Fandango. Written by Juan Carlos Calderón; produced by José Quintana and Herb Alpert. The album spent 21 weeks on the R&R jazz chart, peaking at #12 on July 2.

  • Herb Alpert – Trumpet
  • José Quintana – Backing vocals
  • Victor Ruiz Pazos – Bass
  • Carlos Vega – Drums
  • Miguel Peña – Guitar
  • Bill Cuomo – Keyboards
  • Paulinho DaCosta – Percussion

r-1888880-1250325545.jpeg

#13: “Paradise” by Herbie Hancock from the #13 album, Lite Me Up. Written by Herbie Hancock, Jay Graydon, David Foster, and Bill Champlin; produced by Jay Graydon. The album spent 14 weeks on the R&R jazz chart, peaking at #4 on July 2.

  • Herbie Hancock – Vocals, keyboards
  • Jay Graydon – Guitar
  • Jeff Porcaro – Drums
  • Abe Laboriel – Bass
  • David Foster – Acoustic piano
  • Bill Champlin, Richard Page, Venette Gloud – Background vocals

hubbard

#11: “Birdland” by Freddie Hubbard from the #11 album, Ride Like the Wind. Written by Joe Zawinul; produced by Jeffrey Weber. The album spent 8 weeks on the R&R jazz chart, peaking here at #11.

  • Freddie Hubbard – Trumpet
  • Bill Maxwell – Drums
  • Joe Porcaro – Percussion
  • Abe Laboriel – Bass
  • Bill Mays – Keyboards
  • Dan Ferguson – Guitars
  • Chuck Findley, Gary Grant – Trumpets
  • Vince Derosa – French Horn
  • Bill Waltrous – Trombone
  • Bud Shank, Bill Perkins, Bob Tricarico – Saxophones

r-1384087-1520385813-6770.jpeg

#7: “Forget Me Nots” by Patrice Rushen from the #7 album, Straight from the Heart. Written by Patrice Rushen, Teri McFadden, and Freddie Washington; produced by Charles Mims Jr. and Patrice Rushen. The album spent 12 weeks on the R&R jazz chart, peaking at #4 on the premiere chart of May 21.

  • Patrice Rushen – Vocals, keyboards
  • Ollie E. Brown – Drums
  • Freddie Washington – Bass
  • Gerald Albright – Saxophone
  • Roy Galloway – Backing vocals

r-1029758-1185903930-jpeg

#5: “San Juan Sunset” by Lee Ritenour from the #5 album, Rio. Written by Eumir Deodato; produced by Lee Ritenour. The album spent 9 weeks on the R&R jazz chart, peaking here at #5.

  • Lee Ritenour – Guitar
  • Dave Grusin – Keyboards
  • Marcus Miller – Bass
  • Buddy Williams – Drums
  • Jeff Mironov – Rhythm Guitar
  • Rubens Bassini – Percussion

danseigel1982

#4: “Soaring” by Dan Siegel from the #4 album, Dan Siegel. Written and produced by Dan Siegel. The album spent 14 weeks on the R&R jazz chart, peaking here at #4.

  • Dan Siegel – Keyboards
  • Rob Thomas – Bass
  • Moyes Lucas, Jr. – Drums
  • Paul Jackson, Jr. – Guitar
  • Lenny Castro – Percussion
  • Mark Hatch – Flugelhorn

r-1743726-1240524063.jpeg

#2: “Hollywood” by Maynard Ferguson from the #2 album, Hollywood. Written and produced by Stanley Clarke. The album spent 16 weeks on the R&R jazz chart, peaking here at #2.

  • Maynard Ferguson – Trumpet
  • Nathan East – Bass
  • Ndugu Chancler – Drums
  • Stanley Clarke – Acoustic Piano
  • Todd Cochran – Keyboards
  • Alex Acuna – Percussion
  • David Sanborn – Saxophone solos
  • Jerry Hey, Chuck Findley, Gary Grant, Larry Hall – Trumpets
  • Charlie Loper, Lew McCreary, Bill Reichenbach – Trombones
  • Jim Horn, Larry Williams, Gary Herbig, Kim Hutchcroft – Saxophones

r-7752234-1448048647-5848.jpeg

#1: “Eighteen” by Pat Metheny Group from the #1 album, Offramp.  Written by Pat Metheny, Lyle Mays, and Nan Vaconcelos; produced by Manfred Eicher. The album spent 27 weeks on the R&R jazz chart, spending 10 consecutive weeks in the #1 position.

  • Pat Metheny – Guitars, guitar synthesizers
  • Lyle Mays – Keyboards
  • Steve Rodby – Bass
  • Dan Gottlieb – Drums
  • Nana Vasconcelos – Percussion, voice

Jazz chart


 

Dr. Smooth’s Flashback #15: Record World #1 albums of 1978

Spend an hour remembering the #1 jazz albums of 1978 according to Record World magazine.

recordworldjazz77

Playlist:


duke

Track 1: “Reach for It” by George Duke, from the album Reach for It.


grover1

Track 2: “You Make Me Dance” by Grover Washington, Jr., from the album Live at The Bijou.


benson

Track 3: “Windsong” by George Benson from the album Weekend in L.A..


feelssogood

Track 4: “Maui-Waui” by Chuck Mangione, from the album, Feels So Good.


quincy

Track 5: “Stuff Like That” by Quincy Jones, from the album Sounds…And Stuff Like That!!.


crusaders

Track 6: “Merry-Go-Round” by The Crusaders from the album Images.


sanchez

Track 7: “Children of Sanchez” by Chuck Mangione, from the album Children of Sanchez.


reedseed

Track 8: “Maracas Beach” by Grover Washington, Jr., from the album, Reed Seed.  


mrgone

Track 9: “Young and Fine” by Weather Report, from the album Mr. Gone.


Thanks to Herc of Herc’s Hideaway for support.

Dr. Smooth’s Flashback #14: Billboard/Cash Box/Record World charts of June 10, 1978

Spend an hour remembering some of the most popular jazz of 1978 as listed on the Top 40 Jazz Albums charts in the June 10, 1978 issues of Billboard, Cash Box, and Record World magazines.

Playlist:


souza

Track 1: “Daisy Mae” by Raul de Souza, from the album Don’t Ask My Neighbors.

Jazz Album Charts: June 10, 1978
Billboard 34
Cash Box 33
Record World 24

klugh

Track 2: “Magic in Your Eyes” by Earl Klugh, from the album Magic in Your Eyes.

Jazz Album Charts: June 10, 1978
Billboard 33
Cash Box 38
Record World 15

sanborn

Track 3: “Lotus Blossom” by David Sanborn from the album Heart to Heart.

Jazz Album Charts: June 10, 1978
Billboard 23
Cash Box 23
Record World 31

noel

Track 4: “Superwoman” by Noel Pointer, from the #39 album of the week, Hold On.

Jazz Album Charts: June 10, 1978
Billboard 17
Cash Box 25
Record World 26

spyro

Track 5: “Mead” by Spyro Gyra, from the album Spyro Gyra.

Jazz Album Charts: June 10, 1978
Billboard 20
Cash Box 21
Record World 21

loveland

Track 6: “Loveland” by Lonnie Liston Smith from the album Loveland.

Jazz Album Charts: June 10, 1978
Billboard 11
Cash Box 8
Record World 10

deodato

Track 7: “Love Island” by Deodato, from the album Love Island.

Jazz Album Charts: June 10, 1978
Billboard 10
Cash Box 9
Record World 8

sample

Track 8: “Rainbow Seeker” by Joe Sample, from the album, Rainbow Seeker.  

Jazz Album Charts: June 10, 1978
Billboard 3
Cash Box 6
Record World 5

clarke

Track 9: “Modern Man” by Stanley Clarke, from the album Modern Man.

Jazz Album Charts: June 10, 1978
Billboard 7
Cash Box 3
Record World 3

benson

Track 10: “Windsong” by George Benson, from the album, Weekend in L.A.

Jazz Album Charts: June 10, 1978
Billboard 1
Cash Box 2
Record World 2

feelssogood

Track 11: “Feels So Good” by Chuck Mangione from the album Feels So Good.

Jazz Album Charts: June 10, 1978
Billboard 2
Cash Box 1
Record World 1

june 10 1978 jazz charts

Thanks to Herc of Herc’s Hideaway for research assistance and support.

Dr. Smooth’s Flashback #13: Elektra/Musician albums 1982

The inspiration for this Flashback is the inner sleeve Elektra/Musician Records used for their releases in May, 1982.

IMG_4447

Playlist:


brownroach

Track 1: “What’s New” by Clifford Brown and Max Roach, from the album Pure Genius, Vol. 1.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Did not chart

puregenius

Produced by Max Roach
Trumpet – Clifford Brown
Tenor Saxophone – Sonny Rollins
Piano – Richard Powell
Bass Violin – George Morrow
Percussion – Max Roach
For more information, click here.

shaw

Track 2: “400 Years Ago Tomorrow” by Woody Shaw, from the album Master of the Art.  

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 42 4

masteroftheart

Produced by Michael Cuscuna
Trumpet, Flugelhorn – Woody Shaw
Trombone – Steve Turre
Piano – Mulgrew Miller
Bass – Stafford James
Drums – Tony Reedus
Vibes – Bobby Hutcherson

For more information, click here.

gale

Track 3: “Blue Horizon” by Eric Gale, from the album Blue Horizon.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 20 16

gale2

Produced by Eric Gale
Lead Guitar – Eric Gale
Drums – Winston Grenman
Rhythm Guitar – Mark Mazur
Percussion – Nasser Nasser
Keyboards – Peter Schott
Bass – Neddy Smith
Drums – Freddie Watts
Flugelhorn – Hugh Masekela

For more information, click here.

sancious

Track 4: “What If?” by David Sancious, from the album The Bridge.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 36 8

sancious

Produced by David Sancious
Piano – David Sancious

For more information, click here.

mcferrin

Track 5: “Dance With Me” by Bobby McFerrin, from the album Bobby McFerrin.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz  41  6

mcf

Produced by Linda Goldstein
Vocals – Bobby McFerrin
Piano & Fender Rhodes – Victor Feldman
Bass – Larry Klein
Acoustic Guitar – Peter Maunu
Drums – John Guerin
Percussion – Kenneth Nash

For more information, click here.

material

Track 6: “Disappearing” by Material, from the album, Memory Serves.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 32 7

material

Produced by Material with Martin Bisi
Guitar – Sonny Sharrock
Alto Saxophone – Henry Threadgill
Cornet – Olu Dara
Drums, Percussion, Guitar – Fred Maher
Bass – Bill Laswell
Synthesizers, Tapes, Radio, Guitar, Drums, Voice – Michael Beinhorn

For more information, click here.

r-2418675-1318765247-jpeg

Track 7: “Sophisticated Yenta” by Red Rodney & Ira Sullivan, from the album Spirit Within.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Did not chart

red

Produced by Mike Berniker
Flugelhorn – Red Rodney
Flugelhorn, Alto Flute, Shaker – Ira Sullivan
Piano – Garry Dial
Drums – Steve Bagby
Bass – Jay Anderson

For more information, click here.

r-1029758-1185903930-jpeg

Track 8: “Simplicidad” by Lee Ritenour, from the album Rio.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 11 33

rio

Produced by Lee Ritenour
Acoustic Guitar – Lee Ritenour
Drums – Paulinho Braga
Bass – Luizao Maia
Rhythm Guitar – Oscar Neves
Keyboards –  Don Grusin
Percussion – Chico Batera, Jose Da Silva, Roberto Pinheiro, Armando Marcal

For more information, click here.

cobham

Track 9: “Chiquita Linda” by Billy Cobham’s Glass Menagerie, from the album Observations &.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 23 13

cobham

Produced by Bill Cobham
Guitar – Dean Brown
Percussion – Bill Cobham
Keyboards – Gil Goldstein
Bass – Tim Landers

For more information, click here.

hubbard

Track 10: “This Is It” by Freddie Hubbard, from the album Ride Like the Wind.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 24 18

fred

Produced by Jeffrey Weber
IMG_006

For more information, click here.

Dr. Smooth’s Flashback #12: Billboard chart of August 8, 1981

Spend an hour remembering some of the most popular jazz of 1981 as listed on the Top 50 Jazz Albums chart in the August 8, 1981 issue of Billboard magazine.

Playlist:


joe sample

#48: “Dream of Dreams” by Joe Sample, from the #48 album of the week, Voices in the Rain. The album was Sample’s fifth “solo” release (and his first on MCA), but he had help from fellow Crusaders Stix Hooper and Wilton Felder. The album debuted on the jazz chart in February of 1981, peaked at #2 in March, and would hang around through the end of August.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 2 30
Billboard 200 65 20
R&B 29 15
1981 Jazz Year End 20

chaka

#43: “Fate” by Chaka Khan, from the #43 album of the week, What Cha’ Gonna Do for Me. This album spent only 8 weeks on the jazz chart during the months of July and August, 1981, peaking at #35 on July 11.  The album is more R&B than jazz, but Khan was supported on this track by several prominent jazz session musicians, including guitarist Hiram Bullock and Richard Tee on Clavinet.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 35 8
Billboard 200 17 18
R&B 3 23

yellowjackets

#39: “Matinee Idol” by Yellowjackets, from the #39 album of the week, Yellowjackets. The lead track from the group’s debut album. This track was released as a 12″ single with the following review blurb on the cover in caps:

“THE YELLOWJACKETS’ ALBUM RANKS AS ONE OF THE FINEST, MOST RADIO-ACCESSIBLE JAZZ-ROCK OFFERINGS OF THE YEAR. GUT REACTION TO THE YELLOWJACKETS PARALLELS THE POWER OF THE CRUSADERS (the good ol’ Crusaders with Larry Carlton, etc.). FEATURED MUSICIANS INCLUDE RUSSELL FERRANTE ON KEYBOARDS, ROBBEN FORD ON GUITAR. A DIGITAL RECORDING, PRODUCED BY TOMMY LiPUMA, YELLOWJACKETS FLOATS LIKE A BUTTERFLY, STINGS LIKE A BEE, AND SOUNDS LIKE A HORNETS’ NEST OF HONEY-DIPPED JAZZ/ROCK. AN EXTREMELY FINE RECORD.”

The week marked the album’s debut on the jazz chart, it would go on to peak at #18 on October 10.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 18 23
Billboard 200 201

s-l300

#33: “Smoke Gets in Your Eyes” by Earl Klugh from the #33 album, Late Night Guitar. This track lead of the album with Klugh simply playing the 1933 Jerome Kern standard alone on his acoustic guitar. The album, Klugh’s seventh as a solo artist, received a Grammy nomination for Best Pop Instrumental Performance, losing to Larry Carlton & Mike Post for “The Theme from Hill Street Blues.” The album had debuted on the chart in December 1980, peaked at #4 in February 1981, and was seven weeks away from ending its 39 week chart run on this August 8 chart.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 4 39
Billboard 200 98 23
R&B 40 18
1981 Jazz Year End 6

8081album

#31: “Every Day (I Thank You)” by Pat Metheny from the #31 album, 80/81. The album features Pat Metheny (leader, guitars), Dewey Redman (tenor saxophone), Charlie Haden (bass), Michael Brecker (tenor saxophone), and Jack DeJohnette (drums). For the record, Brecker plays sax on this particular cut, which took up most of side 4 of this double album set. The album had debuted on the jazz charts way back on November 1, 1980.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 4 44
Billboard 200 89 14
1981 Jazz Year End 5

R-995351-1276442448.jpeg

#18: “Bread Sandwiches” by Bernard Wright from the #18 album, ‘Nard.  The son of singer Roberta Flack, keyboardist Wright hailed from Jamaica, Queens along with other funk-jazzers Tom Browne and Lenny White. This album, released when Wright was only 18, had only a few instrumental tracks, including this one from side two. Released on the fledgling GRP label, this album was produced by label founders Dave Grusin & Larry Rosen. Wright’s only appearance on the jazz charts, this one debuted on April 11, peaked May 9, and slipped off the chart September 12.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 7 22
Billboard 200 116 14
R&B 23 24
1981 Jazz Year End 36

R-2409532-1464360255-5636.jpeg

#13: “Mountain Dance” by Dave Grusin from the #13 album, Mountain Dance.  Grusin was doing it all back in ’81, from film scoring to producing to label management to collaborating to recording his own stuff. This is the title track to his second GRP album, his most successful as a solo act, and can still be heard on smooth jazz radio formats to this day. The album first hit the jazz chart in mid-March, peaked in May, and would hang around the charts until mid-November.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 3 36
Billboard 200 74  18
1981 Jazz Year End 8

applejuice

#9: “Gettin’ Up” by Tom Scott from the #9 album, Apple Juice. A live album, recorded in New York City, featuring Scott backed up by the members of Stuff, plus a few other recognizable session musician names: Eric Gale (electric and acoustic guitar), Hugh McCracken (electric guitar), Richard Tee (keyboards), Marcus Miller (bass), Ralph MacDonald (percussion), and Steve Gadd (drums). On this track, which leads off side two of the album, Scott is featured on the newfangled Lyricon electronic wind instrument (EWI) as well as his usual tenor. At #9 on this particular chart, it would peak two weeks later at #7 and stay on the chart until February 13, 1982.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 7 31
Billboard 200 123 11
1981 Jazz Year End 33

rit

#6: “Is It You?” by Lee Ritenour from the #6 album, RIT. A pop release from a long-time jazzer/session ace, this album did surprisingly well, spurred along by this song. “Is It You?” with vocals by Eric Tagg, was a Top 40 single, hitting #15 not only on the pop chart but also the Adult Contemporary chart. It is also notable for its video receiving considerable airplay during the first few days of air in August, 1981 (it was the 44th, 108th, and 148th video aired).  Ritenour would re-record this song for his 2005 release, Overtime, featuring vocalists Grady Harrell and Kenya Hathaway. The RIT album debuted on the jazz chart on May 9, 1981 and hung around the top ten for almost 6 months.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 4 40
Billboard 200 26 23
R&B 20 20
1981 Jazz Year End 9

voyeur

#4: “Let’s Just Say Goodbye” by David Sanborn from the #4 album, Voyeur. The lead track to Sanborn’s first #1 jazz album.  The album, which stayed on the jazz chart for over a year, featured many recognizable names, including Marcus Miller, Hiram Bullock, Steve Gadd, and Buzzy Feiten. Sanborn’s previous album, Hideaway, occupies the 27 spot on this chart in its 76th week. The Voyeur album had held the #1 spot position two weeks prior to this date, but ultimately spent a total of 30 weeks in the top ten.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 53
Billboard 200 45 22
R&B 18 21
1981 Jazz Year End 4

winelight

#1: “Winelight” by Grover Washington, Jr. from the #1 album, Winelight. A huge crossover hit, this was by far Washington’s most successful album. And all the usual suspects are here: Ralph MacDonald, Marcus Miller, Steve Gadd, Eric Gale, and Richard Tee. This album spent over three years on the jazz chart, including an incredible 31 weeks in the #1 spot. Not only was this the #1 jazz album of 1981, it was also the #18 jazz album of 1982 and the #47 jazz album of 1983.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 183
Billboard 200 5 52
R&B 2 49
1981 Jazz Year End 1

bb81

Dr. Smooth’s Flashback #11: Billboard chart of July 5, 1986

Spend an hour remembering some of the most popular jazz of 1986 as listed on the Top 40 Jazz Albums chart in the July 5, 1986 issue of Billboard magazine.

Playlist:


breakout

#38: “Bob Goes to the Store” by Spyro Gyra, from the #38 album of the week, BreakoutBreakout was the group’s tenth album, released in June, 1986. This chart marked the album’s debut. It would go on to spend two weeks at the #1 spot in late September/early October. “Bob Goes to the Store” is the album’s first track and was written by bass player Kim Stone. The group filmed a promotional video for the song that was later included in a 1990 promotional VHS tape titled Graffiti.

sggraffiti

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 34
Billboard 200 71 19
1986 Jazz Year End 14

perri

#36: “Maybe Tomorrow” by Perrí, from the #36 album of the week, Celebrate. Perrí was a Los Angeles-based vocal group consisting of four sisters: Lori, Sharon, Darlene, and Carolyn Perry. They were discovered by Pat Metheny and later supported Anita Baker on tour. Celebrate was the quartet’s debut album. This issue of Billboard marked the album’s final appearance on the jazz chart; it had debuted on the chart back on March 15.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 14 20
1986 Jazz Year End 48

0002230461

#33: “After” by Makoto Ozone, from the #33 album of the week, After.  After was the Japanese pianist’s second solo album. It debuted here in the #33 position on this date and stayed at #33 for the entirety of its chart run. While other tracks feature various sidemen/combos, this track features only Ozone.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 33 4

mi0003808290

#25: “Sandu” by Freddie Hubbard & Woody Shaw from the #25 album, Double Take. This album by two jazz trumpet masters opens with this cover of a Clifford Brown tune.  In addition to Hubbard and Shaw, the track features Kenny Garrett on alto saxophone and Mulgrew Miller on piano. The album debuted on the chart this week at the #25 spot and stayed near that position for its brief chart run.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 19 12

mi0001501679

#21: “Milan” by Ahmad Jamal from the #21 album, Rossiter Road. This Jamal album had debuted on the jazz chart on June 7 and was peaking here at the #21 spot. For this album, Jamal was backed by James Cammack on bass, Herlin Riley on drums, and Manolo Badrena on percussion.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 21 10

shades

#20: “And You Know That” by Yellowjackets from the #20 album, Shades.  At #20, this was the highest debuting album on this particular chart. The track, written by drummer Ricky Lawson and keyboardist Russell Ferrante, won a Grammy Award for “Best R&B Instrumental Performance (Orchestra, Group or Soloist)” and is the album’s lead cut. Track 4 of the album, “Revelation,” features vocals from Perrí (see #36 above).

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 4 32
Billboard 200 195 2
1986 Jazz Year End 16

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#18: “Never As Good As the First Time” by Sade from the #18 album, Promise.  This multi-platinum album debuted on the jazz chart on January 18, had peaked at #4 on March 29, and was on its decline on this date. “Never As Good As the First Time” was the third single released from the album and peaked at #20 pop, #8 R&B, and #6 adult contemporary.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 4 32
Billboard 200 1  46
R&B 1  45
1986 Jazz Year End 10

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#12: “Highland Aire” by Lyle Mays from the #12 album, Lyle Mays. The first solo effort by Pat Metheny Group keyboardist, this album debuted on the jazz chart on May 24 and was peaking here at #12 in its seventh week. Playing with Mays on this album are Alejandro N. Acuña, drums; Billy Drewes, saxophone; Bill Frisell: guitar; Marc Johnson, bass; and Nana Vasconcelos, percussion.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 12 16

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#11: “Majesty” by Cabo Frio from the #11 album, Right on the Money. The fusion group’s second album debuted on the jazz chart on April 12 and was at its peak here at #11. “Majesty” is the album’s 8th track and was written by keyboardist Joey Santora and also features saxophonist Terrance Bruce.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 11 20
1986 Jazz Year End 37

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#5: “Since I Fell for You” by Bob James & David Sanborn from the #5 album, Double Vision. This track, a jazz standard, features vocals by Al Jarreau and won a Grammy award for “Best Jazz Fusion Performance, Vocal or Instrumental,” peaked at #10 on the Billboard Adult Contemporary chart, and was featured in the television show Moonlighting as well as appearing on that show’s compilation. The album debuted on the previous chart at #30 and jumped 25 spots to #5 on this chart. It would spend 8 consecutive weeks in the top spot starting August 2.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 58
Billboard 200 50 64
R&B 16 39
1986 Jazz Year End 7

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#2: “Smiles and Smiles to Go” by Larry Carlton from the #2 album, Alone/But Never AloneThis is the album’s lead track and was written and produced by Carlton. The album debuted on the jazz chart on April 12 and would move from this #2 position to the top spot on the next chart.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 34
Billboard 200 141 11
1986 Jazz Year End 6

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#1: “Love Will Follow” by George Howard from the #1 album, Love Will Follow. This album, which had debuted on March 29, spent 8 consecutive weeks in the #1 spot. This title track is a cover of a Kenny Loggins/Tom Snow song and features Howard on soprano saxophone and Ron Smith on guitar.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 32
Billboard 200 142 11
R&B 22 26
1986 Jazz Year End 3

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As always, thanks to Herc of Herc’s Hideaway for research assistance and support.