Top Albums Released on the Elektra/Musician label, 1982-84

Here’s a list of all 34 albums released on the Elektra/Musician label that reached the Billboard magazine Jazz LPs chart. Albums have been ranked using a formula that takes into account chart peak positions, weeks on chart, and number of weeks at the peak position. Presented below in countdown order, including album’s chart peak and total number of weeks on the chart.

2935

Rank Artist Album Peak Weeks
24 John McLaughlin My Goal’s Beyond 34 6
23 Material Memory Serves 32 7
22 Various Artists The Griffith Park Collection 35 12
21 Kevin Eubanks Guitarist 32 10
20 Jimmy Smith Keep On Comin’ 35 13

2420

Rank Artist Album Peak Weeks
19 Various Artists Echoes of an Era 2 29 10
18 Bobby McFerrin The Voice 24 10
17 Various Artists In Performance at The Playboy Jazz Festival 35 14
16 Chico Freeman Tradition in Transition 31 12
15 Charlie Parker One Night in Washington 28 10

1915

1410

95

Rank Artist Album Peak Weeks
4 Lee Ritenour On the Line 12 30
3 Lee Ritenour Rio 11 33
2 Steps Ahead Modern Times 11 39
1 Jimmy Smith Off the Top 5 43

41


Dr. Smooth’s Flashback #9: Billboard chart of October 20, 1984

Spend an hour remembering some of the most popular jazz of fall 1984 as listed on the Top 40 Jazz Albums chart in the October 20, 1984 issue of Billboard magazine.

Playlist:


al_jarreau_jarreau_cover

#40: “Step by Step” by Al Jarreau, from the #40 album of the week, Jarreau. By this date, Jarreau had been on the jazz chart for 78 weeks  (it debuted at #18 on April 30, 1983) and would finally leave the chart on November 17. This album would rest in the top position for 16 consecutive weeks, May 14-September 10, 1983. It is listed below as #10 on the 1984 year end chart, but was ranked at #2 on the 1983 year end chart.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 81
Billboard 200 13 43
R&B 4 43
1984 Jazz Year End 10

51wxqbthsml-_sy300_

#38: “Samba Dees Days” by Stan Getz & Charlie Byrd, from the #38 album of the week, Jazz Samba. This album was originally released in 1962, started the bossa nova craze in the US, and hit #1 on the pop chart. It was included in an August 1984 series of Verve reissues by Polygram. This particular tune was written by Byrd, the remaining songs on the album were written by Brazilian composers, including Antonio Carlos Jobim. This was the reissue’s third of 15 weeks on the jazz charts.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz (1984) 22 15
Billboard 200 (1962) 1 70

imaginethis

#36: “The Shadow of Your Smile” by Pieces of a Dream, from the #36 album of the week, Imagine This. This was the group’s third album and, after peaking at #4 back in February, was making its final chart appearance this week. This tune, also known as “Love Theme from The Sandpiper,” was written by Johnny Mandel and premiered in 1965. At that time, it won the Grammy Award for Song of the Year and the Academy Award for Best Original Song.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 4 40
Billboard 200 90 15
R&B 16 40
1984 Jazz Year End 12

first-circle

#27: “Yolanda, You Learn” by the Pat Metheny Group from the #27 album, First Circle. This week marked the chart debut of First Circle. The album would stay on the jazz chart until March 1986 and win the Grammy Award for “Best Jazz Fusion Performance.” It spent 6 weeks at in the #2 position, held out of the top spot by Wynton Marsalis’ Hot House Flowers album. On this date, Metheny had another album on the jazz charts: Rejoicing was at #18.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 2 75
Billboard 200 91 35
1985 Jazz Year End 3

cover

#26: “Love Theme from ‘London and Davis in New York'” by Chuck Mangione from the #26 album, Disguise. Mangione’s chart appearances were in decline by this point in his career and, to that end, that cover photo may have been a poor choice to boost sales. In its fifth week on the jazz chart, it peaked here at #26. This track was a theme for a failed CBS TV pilot starring Richard Crenna as a crime-solving photographer.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 26 11
Billboard 200 148 8

ronstadt_whatsnew

#23: “Someone to Watch Over Me” by Linda Ronstadt from the #23 album, What’s New. A jazz standard on the first of three Ronstadt albums in which she teamed with legendary orchestra leader Nelson Riddle to record selections from the American songbook. A big seller on multiple charts, this album debuted on the jazz chart in December 1983. The beautiful ballad “Someone to Watch Over Me” was composed by George Gershwin with lyrics by brother Ira Gershwin for the 1926 musical Oh, Kay!

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 5 60
Billboard 200 3 81
1984 Jazz Year End 7

banded_together

#22: “Sunset Drivers” by Lee Ritenour from the #22 album, Banded Together. This pop album was released in an attempt to recapture the minor pop chart success Ritenour had with 1981’s Rit album. It didn’t fare as well; this particular week marked the album’s 17th week on the jazz chart and was on a fast descent after peaking at #6. Eric Tagg provides vocals on this track.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 6 20
Billboard 200 145 8
1984 Jazz Year End 39

moderntimes

#19: “Now You Know” by Steps Ahead from the #19 album, Modern TimesSteps Ahead were a jazz “supergroup” consisting of Warren Bernhardt (keyboards), Eddie Gomez (bass), Peter Erskine (drums), Michael Brecker (sax), and Mike Mainieri (vibes) that attempted to pick up where Weather Report left off. This album, on the short-lived Elektra/Musician label, had peaked at #11 in September.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 11 39
1984 Jazz Year End 27

r-5249006-1388696858-9966-jpeg

#17: “Take It From the Top” by Earl Klugh from the #17 album, Wishful Thinking. This album held the top spot on the jazz chart for two weeks in July, 1984. The album’s follow-up, Night Songs, would debut on the chart following this one, November 3. This track is uncharacteristic of Klugh in that it utilizes a big band; it was used as the theme for CBS Sports’ PGA Tour coverage from 1985 through 1990.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 47
Billboard 200 69 23
R&B 18 27
1984 Jazz Year End 6

large

#8: “It’s All Right With Me” by Frank Sinatra from the #8 album, L.A. is My Lady. Sinatra’s final solo album, it attempted to do for Los Angeles what his earlier “Theme from ‘New York, New York'” did for NYC. The album sessions were filmed, with a small audience, and released as Frank Sinatra: Portrait of an Album. “It’s All Right With Me” was written by Cole Porter for his 1953 musical Can-Can.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 8 21
Billboard 200 58 13

backstreet

#3: “I Told U So” by David Sanborn from the #3 album, Backstreet. By this date, the album had been in the jazz chart 48 weeks, had held the #1 spot 14 weeks, and was on its way to being listed as the chart’s top album of the year. This track, the album’s first cut, was written by Sanborn with guitarist Hiram Bullock.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 70
Billboard 200 81 33
R&B 21 47
1984 Jazz Year End 1

r-1764379-1325292820-jpeg

#1: “Old San Juan” by Spyro Gyra from the #1 album, Access All Areas.  This 2 LP set was recorded in Gainesville, St. Petersburg, and Orlando, Florida, November 17-19, 1983. It debuted on the jazz chart on July 7 and spent September 1 – November 10 in the top spot. When the album was released on a CD, the album’s first track, “Old San Juan” was cut so the album could be released on a single CD. Years later, the band released an unedited version of the track as a download from their website. It is that version that caps off this flashback mix.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 37
Billboard 200 59 19
R&B 41 13
1984 Jazz Year End 11

bbjazzchart


As always, thanks to Herc of Herc’s Hideaway for research assistance and support.

Charting the Charts: Grover Washington, Jr – A Secret Place (1976)

chartingthecharts


gwj

Here’s a look at how the Grover Washington, Jr. album A Secret Place fared on various charts (chart peaks in bold):

1977 Billboard Cash Box Record World*
Date 200 Jazz Soul 200 Jazz R&B 200 Jazz R&B
Jan 1 31
Jan 8 45 159 9 59 109
Jan 15 121 10 37 109 2 50 72 3 18
Jan 22 71 15 87 2 36 60
Jan 29 51 1 11 73 1 19 54 1 13
Feb 5 41 9 65 1 17 49 1 12
Feb 12 39 1 7 58 1 16 44 1 12
Feb 19 36 7 54 2 14 40 2 11
Feb 26 33 2 12 51 2 13 45
Mar 5 31 12 48 2 12 65 2 11
Mar 12 31 2 12 63 2 14 67 3 17
Mar 19 42 12 71 2 14 71 3 24
Mar 26 39 2 15 76 3 20 81 3
Apr 2 55 15 76 3 28 130 4
Apr 9 132 2 17 119 3 43
Apr 16 132 48 122 4 50 166
Apr 23 178 4 48 148 7 62
Apr 30 195 173 8 71
May 7 9
May 14 7 10 18
May 21 11 22
May 28 11 10 33
Jun 4 10 35
Jun 11 12 12
Jun 18 20
Jun 25 12 23
Jul 2 29
Jul 9 34
1977 Billboard Cash Box Record World*
*Record World chart data incomplete, will update as information becomes available

Charting the Charts: Maynard Ferguson – Conquistador (1977)

chartingthecharts


mf_conquistador

Here’s a look at how the Maynard Ferguson album Conquistador fared on various charts:

1977
Date Billboard Jazz (40) Billboard 200 Cash Box 200 Cash Box Jazz (40)
April 2 159 157 17
April 9 18 121 127 8
April 16 110 107 6
April 23 3 91 87 5
April 30 81 81 5
May 7 70 75 6
May 14 6 49 69 6
May 21 40 62 6
May 28 2 37 57 5
June 4 29 52 6
June 11 1 26 49 7
June 18 24 47 6
June 25 3 22 45 7
July 2 22 47 7
July 9 9 45 56 6
July 16 45 67 15
July 23 7 68 80 16
July 30 68 98 17
Aug 6 * 64 102 16
Aug 13 62 121 22
Aug 20 6 62 160 23
Aug 27 58 174 28
Sept 3 78 30
Sept 10 14 103
Sept 17 103
Sept 24 15 195
Oct 1
Oct 8 15*

*In 1977, Billboard published a top 40 Jazz Albums list in the 2nd and 4th issue of every month but one: for some reason, charts were not published in the August 13 and August 27 issues. Instead, one chart was printed that month in the August 20 issue. Also, the October 8 chart was simply a reprint of the previous list of September 24.


REVIEWS:

conquis

Billboard, March 26, 1977, p. 78

maynarddb

Down Beat, July 14, 1977, p. 42


rocky

Dr. Smooth’s Flashback #6: Billboard Contemporary Jazz chart of August 20, 1988

Spend an hour remembering some of the most popular jazz of late summer 1988 as listed on the Top Contemporary Jazz Albums chart in the August 20, 1988 issue of Billboard magazine.

Playlist:


shaw

#25: “Put It Where You Want It” by George Shaw and Jetstream, from the #25 album of the week, Skywalkers. This classic Crusaders tune was the lead track from this covers album; that’s the Crusaders’ Wilton Felder on saxophone. The album had premiered on the Contemporary Jazz chart on July 9; this week marked its final appearance.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 19 8

take6

#24: “Spread Love” by Take 6, from the #24 album of the week, Take 6. The a capella gospel album premiered on the chart this week before having a surprising ten week. The album spent 2 full years on a Billboard chart that went through 3 names during those two years: “Spiritual,” “Inspirational,” and, finally, “Contemporary Christian.” The album won a Grammy award for Best Soul Gospel Performance by a Duo or Group, Choir or Chorus while this song won for Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Duo or Group.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 19 10
Billboard 200 71 19
R&B 41 22
Spiritual/Inspirational 3 104

13852256_350_350

#23: “River Song” by Dave Grusin and Don Grusin, from the #23 album of the week, Sticks and Stones.  Keyboardists Dave and younger brother Don put out this album on Dave’s GRP label (Dave is the G in GRP). This album only charted for 2½ months, but Dave was too busy to mind – he won the best original score Oscar in 1988 for his soundtrack to The Milagro Beanfield War.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 14 10

1423_foto1_product_groot

#22: “Nothing Can Come Between Us” by Sade from the #22 album, Stronger Than Pride. This was a successful single from a huge album – the single peaked at #3 R&B and #21 Adult Contemporary. Despite the fact that only lead singer Sade Adu appears on the album covers, the label and musicians insist that Sade is a band name.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 21 12
Billboard 200 7 45
R&B 3 44

download

#19: “Smoke Gets in Your Eyes” by Patti Austin from the #19 album, The Real Me. This album, Austin’s seventh, consists mainly of standards updated with modern arrangements. This cut was written by composer Jerome Kern and lyricist Otto Harbach for the 1933 musical Roberta. This version was arranged and produced by David Pack (Ambrosia) and features sax work from Ernie Watts.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 7 16
R&B 56 14

0000057343_500

#16: “Los Cabos” by the Rippingtons from the #16 album, Kilimanjaro. The band’s second album, this album had debuted on the Contemporary Jazz chart at #9 on April 30; it was near the end of its chart run on this date.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 3 20
Billboard 200 110 15
1988 Jazz Year End 14

mi0001810979

#14: “The Power of Suggestion” by Richard Elliot from the #14 album, The Power of Suggestion. The title track from this instrumental pop album was featured on many of the emerging smooth jazz radio stations at the time. That’s bassist Cliff Hugo doing his best imitation of Jimmy Haslip of the Yellowjackets. The album premiered on the Contemporary Jazz chart July 23 and was still on its ascent.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 12 14

crusaders-1988-life_in_the_modern_world

#13: “Coulda’, Woulda’, Shoulda'” by The Crusaders from the #13 album, Life in the Modern World.  The band was well into its third decade at this point and its popularity was waning. This track  features the usual stellar performances from pianist Joe Sample and the aforementioned Felder. This week, the album’s fifth on the chart, marked its peak.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 13 10

mi0002270421

#9: “The Key to You” by David Benoit from the #9 album, Every Step of the Way. David Pack makes a second appearance on this flashback playlist, this time as songwriter and vocalist on this track which dented the Adult Contemporary chart, peaking at #40. The song was co-written by Benoit, who contributes several piano solos. The album, Benoit’s eleventh, was nominated for a Best Jazz Fusion Performance Grammy award.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 4 22
Billboard 200 129 14
1988 Jazz Year End 15

r-1223750-1201883576-jpeg

#7: “Local Hero” by Yellowjackets from the #7 album, Politics. This was the album’s seventh week on the chart and was still climbing. This album won the Grammy award for Best Jazz Fusion Performance. On their 1992 live album, Live Wires, the band would rename this song “The Dream” and feature Michael Franks on vocals.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 5 20
1988 Jazz Year End 20

simple-pleasures-522bac8f23684

#4: “Drive My Car” by Bobby McFerrin from the #4 album, Simple Pleasures.  A Beatles cover from a huge summer album. The album would hold the #1 spot on the Contemporary Jazz chart for 4 weeks, June 11 – July 8 and later for 6 weeks, October 1 – November 11, but wouldn’t exit the chart until the following May.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 1 54
Billboard 200 5 55
R&B 12 41
1988 Jazz Year End 3

12

#3: “Claire’s Dream” by Spyro Gyra from the #3 album, Rites of Summer. The lead track from the group’s 1988 offering, this track was written by saxophonist/producer Jay Beckenstein. Following this week at #3, the album would spend 4 weeks in the top spot before being ousted by the above McFerrin album.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 1 20
Billboard 200 104 8
1988 Jazz Year End 12

basia_-_time_and_tide_album_cover

#2: “Time and Tide” by Basia from the #2 album, Tide and Tide. The video for this track received some airplay on MTV and boosted the single to several charts: #19 Adult Contemporary, #26 pop. The album spent the month prior to this August 20 chart in the #1 spot. It charted a remarkable 62 consecutive weeks, from February 20, 1988 through April 15, 1989.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 1 62
Billboard 200 36 77
1988 Jazz Year End 2

mi0003591290

#1: “Lesley Ann” by David Sanborn from the #1 album, Close-Up.  In the top spot in only its fifth week on the chart, this would be its only appearance at #1. It would remain on the Contemporary Jazz chart, however, through April 1989. This track features guitarist Hiram Bullock, producer/bassist Marcus Miller, and vocals by Michael Ruff. The album won the Grammy award for Best Pop Instrumental Performance (Orchestra, Group or Soloist).

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 1 40
Billboard 200 59 28
R&B 38 19
1988 Jazz Year End 9

jazzchart


As always, thanks to Herc of Herc’s Hideaway for research assistance and support.

Cranberry Records

In late 1985, MCA Records offered basketball legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar his own jazz imprint, Cranberry Records. Unfortunately, the label never got off the ground. What follows is a documentation of the label’s short life as told through primary sources:



cranberry-7

Billboard, December 28, 1985, p. 71


cranberry-8

Billboard, February 15, 1986, p. 56


cranberry-5

Billboard, February 22, 1986, p. 52


cranberry-4

Billboard, March 22, 1986, p. 60


Untitled

Rolling Stone, April 10, 1986, p. 17


cranberry-3

Billboard, March 21, 1987, p. 31


cranberry-15

Down Beat, April 1987, p. 13


cranberry-2

Billboard, April 4, 1987, p. 33


cranberry-1

Billboard, May 16, 1987, p. 66


cranberry-6

Billboard, July 4, 1987, p. 31


cranberry-9

Billboard, March 5, 1988, p. 59


Ben Sidran interviews Kareem Abdul-Jabbar about jazz. Conversation about Cranberry begins about 6 minutes in:

KAREEM ABDUL JABBAR TALKING JAZZ



Dr. Smooth’s Flashback #5: Billboard chart of October 26, 1985

Spend an hour remembering some of the most popular jazz of Autumn 1985 as listed on the Top Jazz Albums chart in the October 26, 1985 issue of Billboard magazine.

Playlist:


wayne-shorter-atlantis-press-k-486376

#39: “Endangered Species” by Wayne Shorter, from the #39 album of the week, Atlantis. While Atlantis was Shorter’s 16th solo album, it was his first since 1974. During the intervening years, Shorter had mainly recorded as a member of Weather Report. This week marked the album’s debut on the jazz chart. Trivia: the pastel portrait of Shorter on the album cover was composed by actor Billy Dee Williams.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 32 10

wildromance

#38: “It’s All for You” by Herb Alpert, from the #38 album of the week, Wild Romance. The album had debuted on the jazz chart on September 14; this week would mark its last appearance on the jazz chart, although it had a slightly longer run on the Billboard 200.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 35 8
Billboard 200 151 10

51t0krmhovl

#37: “Imagination” by Al Jarreau from the #37 album, High Crime. This album, his fourth with producer Jay Graydon, was released in late 1984 and had debuted on the jazz chart on December 1, 1984. The album was nearing the end of its chart run on this date, having been on the chart for 48 weeks.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 2 53
Billboard 200 49 35
R&B 12 33
1985 Jazz Year End 7

first-circle

#30: “If I Could” by the Pat Metheny Group from the #30 album, First Circle. By this point, this album had been on the jazz chart for 54 weeks, having debuted more than a year earlier. It quickly rose to the #2 position, kept from the top spot by Wynton Marsalis’ Hot House Flowers album. It would retain a spot in the low 30’s on the album chart for a few months before falling off in March 1986. In February 1985, the album won the Grammy award for Best Jazz Fusion Performance.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 2 75
Billboard 200 91 35
1985 Jazz Year End 3

benson

#23: “Beyond the Sea” by George Benson from the #23 album, 20/20. Benson’s big band take on this standard from 1946 was the last track on side one of this album and features Benson on a scat guitar solo, a rarity in the mid-80s. On this week, 20/20 was nearing the end its run on the jazz chart, having debuted back on February 16.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 3 48
Billboard 200 45 32
R&B 20 34
1985 Jazz Year End 5

51uyrbrjd0l

#22: “Smooth Operator” by Sade from the #22 album, Diamond Life. This song was a #5 single on the Billboard Hot 100. This album, the band’s debut, debuted on the jazz chart on March 30 and was enjoying its 31st week on the chart. However, it was nowhere near the end of its chart run, which ultimately ended in June 1986.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 5 66
Billboard 200 5 81
R&B 3 76
1985 Jazz Year End 14

51d7wqqc73l-_ss500_ss280

#20: “Run for Cover” by David Sanborn from the #20 album, Straight from the Heart. Recorded live in studio in front of a small crowd, this album mixes some songs from Sanborn’s earlier albums along with a few covers. The studio version of “Run for Cover” was released in 1981 on Sanborn’s Voyeur album. The song was written by, and features, bassist Marcus Miller. The album was number one on the jazz chart for 6 weeks in late March and April of 1985. In February 1986, the album would win the Grammy award for Best Jazz Fusion Performance.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 74
Billboard 200 64 32
R&B 31 20
1985 Jazz Year End 4

r-395747-1112839368

#17: “Aural Oasis” by Wynton Marsalis from the #17 album, Black Codes (from the Underground).  This post-bop album was the highest charting debut on this October 26 chart. In February 1986, the album would win two Grammy awards: Best Jazz Instrumental Performance, Soloist, and Best Jazz Instrumental Performance Group. Black Codes would go on to spend an incredible 30+ weeks in the top ten of the jazz chart, including 4 weeks at the #2 position (Stanley Jordan’s Magic Touch album was at #1 during those weeks – see #1, below).

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 2 42
Billboard 200 118 10

american-eyes

#14: “Oops!” by Rare Silk from the #14 album, American Eyes. This vocalized cover of Steps Ahead’s “Oops!” leads off this album, the quartet’s second. The album debuted on the jazz chart on April 13; on this date, the album was on its slow chart descent after spending the summer in the chart’s top ten.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 4 44
1985 Jazz Year End 10

earl_klugh-1984-soda_fountain_shuffle

#8: “Moonlight Dancing” by Earl Klugh from the #8 album, Soda Fountain Shuffle. Guitarist Earl Klugh has been a staple on the jazz charts since 1976. This 12th studio album, which debuted on May 11, had peaked on the chart a few months earlier, but was still enjoying top ten status. Klugh wrote and produced all ten songs on the album, including “Moonlight Dancing” which was track 4 on side one.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 3 44
Billboard 200 110 17
R&B 23 21
1985 Jazz Year End 13

600x600

#2: “Love Will Find a Way” by George Howard from the #2 album, Dancing in the Sun. This song, the album’s lead track, is an instrumental cover of a song which original appeared on Lionel Richie’s Can’t Slow Down album. The album debuted on May 11 and had spent the 6 weeks previous to this October 26 chart in the #1 spot. It wouldn’t exit the chart until June 1986.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 62
Billboard 200 169 4
R&B 47 25
1985 Jazz Year End 6

96iasqucb1adfi1w4zl_36hn9ii

#1: “The Lady in My Life” by Stanley Jordan from the #1 album, Magic Touch.
This Rod Temperton tune originally closed out Michael Jackson’s Thriller album. Magic Touch was Jordan’s major label debut and spent a remarkable 46 non-consecutive weeks in the #1 spot.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Jazz 1 86
Billboard 200 64 66
R&B 31 61
1985 Jazz Year End 2

bbjaz


As always, thanks to Herc of Herc’s Hideaway for research assistance and support.