Columbia’s Jingle Bell Jazz, 1980 re-release

Jingle Bell Jazz is a collection of jazz versions of Christmas songs recorded between 1959 and 1962 by some of the most popular artists on the Columbia label. It was first issued October 17, 1962. The album was reissued twice on LP, in 1973 and 1980, with a track alteration and different cover art. These reissues replace side 2, track 3, originally “Frosty the Snowman” by The Dukes of Dixieland, with “Deck the Halls” by Herbie Hancock, recorded in 1969.

jingle-bell-jazz-500

Playlist:


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Side one, track one:

jinglebells


Side one, track two:

whitechristmas


Side one, track three:

winterwonderland


Side one, track four:

christmassong


Side one, track five:

rudolph


Side one, track six:

we3


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Side two, track one:

santabrubeck

 


Side two, track two:

deck1


Side two, track three:

deck


Side two, track four:

bell


Side two, track five:

marlowe


Side two, track six:

miles


credits1


Charting the Charts: Maynard Ferguson – Conquistador (1977)

chartingthecharts


mf_conquistador

Here’s a look at how the Maynard Ferguson album Conquistador fared on various charts:

1977
Date Billboard Jazz (40) Billboard 200 Cash Box 200 Cash Box Jazz (40)
April 2 159 157 17
April 9 18 121 127 8
April 16 110 107 6
April 23 3 91 87 5
April 30 81 81 5
May 7 70 75 6
May 14 6 49 69 6
May 21 40 62 6
May 28 2 37 57 5
June 4 29 52 6
June 11 1 26 49 7
June 18 24 47 6
June 25 3 22 45 7
July 2 22 47 7
July 9 9 45 56 6
July 16 45 67 15
July 23 7 68 80 16
July 30 68 98 17
Aug 6 * 64 102 16
Aug 13 62 121 22
Aug 20 6 62 160 23
Aug 27 58 174 28
Sept 3 78 30
Sept 10 14 103
Sept 17 103
Sept 24 15 195
Oct 1
Oct 8 15*

*In 1977, Billboard published a top 40 Jazz Albums list in the 2nd and 4th issue of every month but one: for some reason, charts were not published in the August 13 and August 27 issues. Instead, one chart was printed that month in the August 20 issue. Also, the October 8 chart was simply a reprint of the previous list of September 24.


REVIEWS:

conquis

Billboard, March 26, 1977, p. 78

maynarddb

Down Beat, July 14, 1977, p. 42


rocky

Cash Box #1 Jazz Albums of 1977

In 1977 issue, Cash Box magazine published a Jazz Album list weekly.  Forty albums were ranked in each chart. Here’s a chart of the #1 jazz albums for 1977:

Week Ending Album Artist(s)
January 1 Breezin’ George Benson
January 8
January 15
January 22
January 29 A Secret Place Grover Washington, Jr.
February 5
February 12
February 19 In Flight George Benson
February 26
March 5
March 12
March 19
March 26
April 2
April 9
April 16 Heavy Weather Weather Report
April 23 In Flight George Benson
April 30 Heavy Weather Weather Report
May 7
May 14
May 21
May 28
June 4
June 11 Friends and Strangers Ronnie Laws
June 18 Heavy Weather Weather Report
June 25 Free as the Wind The Crusaders
July 2
July 9
July 16
July 23
July 30
August 6
August 13
August 20
August 27
September 3
September 10
September 17
September 24
October 1
October 8
October 15
October 22
October 29 Enigmatic Ocean Jean-Luc Ponty
November 5
November 12
November 19
November 26 Feels So Good Chuck Mangione
December 3 Reach for It George Duke
December 10
December 17 Heads Bob James
December 24
December 31

Dr. Smooth’s Flashback #7: Cash Box Jazz album chart of March 6, 1982

Spend an hour remembering some of the most popular jazz of late winter 1982 as listed on the Top 30 Jazz Albums chart in the March 6, 1982 issue of Cash Box magazine.

Playlist:


patti

#30: “Baby, Come to Me” by Patti Austin with James Ingram, from the #30 album of the week, Every Home Should Have One. This smooth single was written by Rod Temperton and produced by Quincy Jones, the duo that would bring the world Michael Jackson’s Thriller album later in the year. It was released without much impact in the spring of ’82, but was re-released in October after being feature on the soap opera General Hospital and became a huge hit on the pop, adult contemporary and R&B charts. The immediately recognizable voice of Michael McDonald sings back up on the chorus. Patti, the goddaughter of Quincy Jones, was the first signee to his new label, Qwest and this album was one of the label’s first releases. This was the album’s last of 19 weeks on the jazz chart.

Cash Box Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Top 200 Albums 55 25

miles_davis_the_man_with_the_horn

#29: “The Man With the Horn” by Miles Davis, from the #29 album of the week, The Man With the Horn. This title track, a tribute to Davis himself (“His music sets the pace but masters never have to race”), features lead vocals by Randy Hall and trumpet work by Miles filtered through some sort of wa-wa synthesizer throughout. The album, Davis’s first new release since 1975 following a six-year reclusive retirement, was not well-received by critics but spent over 30 weeks on the Cash Box jazz chart, peaking at #1 back around September, 1981.

Cash Box Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Top Albums 40 16

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#28: “It’s for You” by Pat Metheny & Lyle Mays, from the #28 album of the week, As Falls Wichita, So Falls Wichita Falls. Side one of this album features the  epic 20 minute title track; this song from side two, however, became one of the more popular cuts on the album, having later been covered by several artists and appearing in the 1985 Kevin Costner movie, Fandango. The album is notable as one of the few albums in which Metheny, in addition to his signature guitar work, also plays bass. The album had peaked on the chart at #2 in August, 1981.

Cash Box Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Top Albums 61 20

freetime

#21: “Telluride” by Spyro Gyra from the #21 album, Freetime. This cut from the group’s 1981 album features mallet work by Dave Samuels and a saxophone solo from band leader/composer/producer Jay Beckenstein. The album, the group’s fifth, had peaked at #3 in early October, 1981.

Cash Box Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Top Albums 40 29

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#19: “Segue/There’s a Way” by Ronnie Laws from the #19 album, Solid Ground. The second and third tracks on Laws’ 1981 album. “There’s a Way” features vocals and sax work by Laws. After attending Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches, Texas, Laws was briefly a member of Earth, Wind & Fire and the influence of Maurice White is evident on this track. This album was Laws’ sixth solo effort and had previously peaked at #5 on the jazz albums chart.

Cash Box Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Top Albums 55 22

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#15: “Valdez in the Country” by the Ernie Watts from the #15 album, Chariots of Fire. This cover of a 1973 Donny Hathaway instrumental leads off side two of this album, Watts’ first solo album on the aforementioned Qwest label. In addition to tenor sax work from Watts, the track features a synth solo by Don Grusin and trumpet arrangements by studio legend Jerry Hey. Half of the album’s eight tracks are covers of music from Vangelis’ soundtrack to Chariots of Fire.

qwest

Cash Box Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Top Albums 156 9

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#10: “Sleepwalk” by Larry Carlton from the #10 album, Sleepwalk. This title track is a cover of the instrumental by Santo & Johnny that hit #1 in 1959. The song features Carlton on his  Valley Arts Stratocaster and was released as a single and briefly placed on the adult contemporary charts in ’82.

Cash Box Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Top Albums 88 10

ponty

#9: “As” by Jean-Luc Ponty from the #9 album, Mystical AdventuresThe third consecutive cover on this compilation is fusion cover of Stevie Wonder’s “As.” The song features solos by Ponty on electric violin and Jamie Glaser on guitar; Ponty also tries his hand at the vocoder. The bass player on this cut is Randy Jackson, who would go on to become a judge on American Idol.

Cash Box Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Top Albums 68 15

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#8: “Time to Say Goodbye” by Angela Bofill from the #8 album, Something About You. The ballad, written by Bofill, closed this 1981 album, produced by Narada Michael Walden. It was selected as the B-side for two of the album’s three singles. Like our previous Ponty cut, this song features Randy Jackson on bass. On this date, the album had been on the jazz album chart for 17 weeks and had begun its descent from a peak at #5.

Cash Box Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Top Albums 66 26

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#5: “Twinkle” by Earl Klugh from the #5 album, Crazy for You. This upbeat piece features Klugh on acoustic guitar, Paulinho Da Costa on percussion, and Louis Johnson (of The Brothers Johnson) on bass. Klugh solos on guitar and Greg Phillinganes contributes an electric piano solo. The album, Klugh’s eighth, had earlier peaked at #3 in late January.

Cash Box Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Top Albums 59 26

gbc

#2: “Turn Your Love Around” by George Benson from the #2 album, The George Benson Collection. This hit single, the lead track from the 1981 greatest hits 2 LP set was written by Bill Champlin of Chicago, guitarist Steve Lukather of Toto and producer/guitarist Jay Graydon. The song won a Grammy award for Best R&B Song. The album, which earlier spent 5 weeks in the #1 spot, was a compilation of Benson’s best work from the years 1969-1981.

Cash Box Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Top Albums 17 30

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#1: “Jamming” by Grover Washington, Jr. from the #1 album, Come Morning.  This cover of a 1977 Bob Marley tune smooths out the original’s reggae lilt and opened side two of the album. The album features an all-star cast of musicians including Steve Gadd, Marcus Miller, Richard Tee, and Eric Gale. This chart marked the album’s fifth consecutive week in the top position. The song was released as a single b/w “East River Drive.”

jamming

Cash Box Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Top Albums 31 27

cash-box-jazz


As always, thanks to Herc of Herc’s Hideaway for research assistance and support.

Cash Box #1 Jazz Albums of 1976

Beginning with the July 10, 1976 issue, Cash Box magazine published a Jazz Album list weekly.  Forty albums were ranked in each chart. Here’s a chart of the sole #1 jazz album for the latter half of 1976:

Week Ending Album Artist(s)
July 10 Breezin’ George Benson
July 17
July 24
July 31
August 7
August 14
August 21
August 28
September 4
September 11
September 18
September 25
October 2
October 9
October 16
October 23
October 30
November 6
November 13
November 20
November 27
December 4
December 11
December 18
December 25

cash-box


Charting the Charts: Tom Scott – Apple Juice (1981)

chartingthecharts


xat-1245586164

Here’s a look at how the Tom Scott album Apple Juice fared in various publications:

1981
Date Billboard Jazz (50) Billboard 200 Cash Box 200 Cash Box Jazz (30)
July 11 34 161 173 23
July 18 20 147 151 15
July 25 10 127 138 10
Aug 1 10 125 128 10
Aug 8 9 123 125 10
Aug 15 9 143 122 9
Aug 22 7 131 122 8
Aug 29 11 131 138 8
Sept 5 10 125 7
Sept 12 17 168 7
Sept 19 17 200 7
Sept 26 13 9
Oct 3  12 12
Oct 10 11 11
Oct 17 12 10
Oct 24 20 15
Oct 31 18 20
Nov 7 18 19
Nov 14 21 19
Nov 21 21 27
Nov 28 24 28
Dec 5 24 26
Dec 12 27
Dec 19 35
Dec 26 34
1982
Date Billboard Jazz (50) Billboard 200 Cashbox 200 Cash Box Jazz (30)
Jan 9 34
Jan 16 32
Jan 23 31
Jan 30 27
Feb 6 43

REVIEWS:

tsapplejuice

DownBeat, January 1982, pp. 34-35

apple-juice

Billboard, June 27, 1981, p. 70

Dr. Smooth’s Flashback #6: Billboard Contemporary Jazz chart of August 20, 1988

Spend an hour remembering some of the most popular jazz of late summer 1988 as listed on the Top Contemporary Jazz Albums chart in the August 20, 1988 issue of Billboard magazine.

Playlist:


shaw

#25: “Put It Where You Want It” by George Shaw and Jetstream, from the #25 album of the week, Skywalkers. This classic Crusaders tune was the lead track from this covers album; that’s the Crusaders’ Wilton Felder on saxophone. The album had premiered on the Contemporary Jazz chart on July 9; this week marked its final appearance.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 19 8

take6

#24: “Spread Love” by Take 6, from the #24 album of the week, Take 6. The a capella gospel album premiered on the chart this week before having a surprising ten week. The album spent 2 full years on a Billboard chart that went through 3 names during those two years: “Spiritual,” “Inspirational,” and, finally, “Contemporary Christian.” The album won a Grammy award for Best Soul Gospel Performance by a Duo or Group, Choir or Chorus while this song won for Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Duo or Group.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 19 10
Billboard 200 71 19
R&B 41 22
Spiritual/Inspirational 3 104

13852256_350_350

#23: “River Song” by Dave Grusin and Don Grusin, from the #23 album of the week, Sticks and Stones.  Keyboardists Dave and younger brother Don put out this album on Dave’s GRP label (Dave is the G in GRP). This album only charted for 2½ months, but Dave was too busy to mind – he won the best original score Oscar in 1988 for his soundtrack to The Milagro Beanfield War.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 14 10

1423_foto1_product_groot

#22: “Nothing Can Come Between Us” by Sade from the #22 album, Stronger Than Pride. This was a successful single from a huge album – the single peaked at #3 R&B and #21 Adult Contemporary. Despite the fact that only lead singer Sade Adu appears on the album covers, the label and musicians insist that Sade is a band name.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 21 12
Billboard 200 7 45
R&B 3 44

download

#19: “Smoke Gets in Your Eyes” by Patti Austin from the #19 album, The Real Me. This album, Austin’s seventh, consists mainly of standards updated with modern arrangements. This cut was written by composer Jerome Kern and lyricist Otto Harbach for the 1933 musical Roberta. This version was arranged and produced by David Pack (Ambrosia) and features sax work from Ernie Watts.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 7 16
R&B 56 14

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#16: “Los Cabos” by the Rippingtons from the #16 album, Kilimanjaro. The band’s second album, this album had debuted on the Contemporary Jazz chart at #9 on April 30; it was near the end of its chart run on this date.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 3 20
Billboard 200 110 15
1988 Jazz Year End 14

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#14: “The Power of Suggestion” by Richard Elliot from the #14 album, The Power of Suggestion. The title track from this instrumental pop album was featured on many of the emerging smooth jazz radio stations at the time. That’s bassist Cliff Hugo doing his best imitation of Jimmy Haslip of the Yellowjackets. The album premiered on the Contemporary Jazz chart July 23 and was still on its ascent.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 12 14

crusaders-1988-life_in_the_modern_world

#13: “Coulda’, Woulda’, Shoulda'” by The Crusaders from the #13 album, Life in the Modern World.  The band was well into its third decade at this point and its popularity was waning. This track  features the usual stellar performances from pianist Joe Sample and the aforementioned Felder. This week, the album’s fifth on the chart, marked its peak.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 13 10

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#9: “The Key to You” by David Benoit from the #9 album, Every Step of the Way. David Pack makes a second appearance on this flashback playlist, this time as songwriter and vocalist on this track which dented the Adult Contemporary chart, peaking at #40. The song was co-written by Benoit, who contributes several piano solos. The album, Benoit’s eleventh, was nominated for a Best Jazz Fusion Performance Grammy award.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 4 22
Billboard 200 129 14
1988 Jazz Year End 15

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#7: “Local Hero” by Yellowjackets from the #7 album, Politics. This was the album’s seventh week on the chart and was still climbing. This album won the Grammy award for Best Jazz Fusion Performance. On their 1992 live album, Live Wires, the band would rename this song “The Dream” and feature Michael Franks on vocals.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 5 20
1988 Jazz Year End 20

simple-pleasures-522bac8f23684

#4: “Drive My Car” by Bobby McFerrin from the #4 album, Simple Pleasures.  A Beatles cover from a huge summer album. The album would hold the #1 spot on the Contemporary Jazz chart for 4 weeks, June 11 – July 8 and later for 6 weeks, October 1 – November 11, but wouldn’t exit the chart until the following May.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 1 54
Billboard 200 5 55
R&B 12 41
1988 Jazz Year End 3

12

#3: “Claire’s Dream” by Spyro Gyra from the #3 album, Rites of Summer. The lead track from the group’s 1988 offering, this track was written by saxophonist/producer Jay Beckenstein. Following this week at #3, the album would spend 4 weeks in the top spot before being ousted by the above McFerrin album.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 1 20
Billboard 200 104 8
1988 Jazz Year End 12

basia_-_time_and_tide_album_cover

#2: “Time and Tide” by Basia from the #2 album, Tide and Tide. The video for this track received some airplay on MTV and boosted the single to several charts: #19 Adult Contemporary, #26 pop. The album spent the month prior to this August 20 chart in the #1 spot. It charted a remarkable 62 consecutive weeks, from February 20, 1988 through April 15, 1989.

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 1 62
Billboard 200 36 77
1988 Jazz Year End 2

mi0003591290

#1: “Lesley Ann” by David Sanborn from the #1 album, Close-Up.  In the top spot in only its fifth week on the chart, this would be its only appearance at #1. It would remain on the Contemporary Jazz chart, however, through April 1989. This track features guitarist Hiram Bullock, producer/bassist Marcus Miller, and vocals by Michael Ruff. The album won the Grammy award for Best Pop Instrumental Performance (Orchestra, Group or Soloist).

Billboard Album Charts: Peak Weeks
Contemporary Jazz 1 40
Billboard 200 59 28
R&B 38 19
1988 Jazz Year End 9

jazzchart


As always, thanks to Herc of Herc’s Hideaway for research assistance and support.